Soy Chicano Forums

Go Back   Soy Chicano Forums > Identity/Culture/Race/Religion > Identity

Identity Anything pertaining to Identity issues.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #26  
Old 03-19-2011
onka yolotl onka yolotl is offline
Chicle
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 100
Default Re: Our Ancestors and Medicine

Quote:
To me, it’s sad that our nations in Mexico were so great and instead of further advancing society, things went backwards.
agree
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 03-26-2011
tecpaocelotl's Avatar
tecpaocelotl tecpaocelotl is offline
The one and only
Presidente
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Cali
Posts: 27,689
Send a message via AIM to tecpaocelotl Send a message via MSN to tecpaocelotl Send a message via Yahoo to tecpaocelotl Send a message via Skype™ to tecpaocelotl
Default Re: Our Ancestors and Medicine

I typed the intro & conclusion to Codex de la Cruz-Badiano.

INTRO:

A little book of the medicinal herbs of the Indians, which a certain Indian of the College of Santa Cruz composed, taught by no formal resonings but educated by experiments only. In the year of our Lord the Savior, 1552.

To the most eminent lord Francisco de Mendoza, the exalted son of the lord viceroy Antonio de Mendoza, the most illustrious superior of these Indies, Martin de la Cruz, his unworthy servitor, prays the greatest health and prosperity.

Since in thee the graces and ornaments of all the virtues shine, and those good gifts that are desired by any mortal, most magnificent lord, I in truth know not what in thee I may most praise. Indeed I do not see by what praises I may bring forth thy marked affection, with what words I may render thanks for thy exceeding beneficence. For thy father, a man most Christian and most devoted, I cannot find words to say how most of all he has favored me; for whatever I am, whatever I posses and whatever name I have, I owe to him. Nothing equal to, nothing worthy I find, for his beneficence. I can indeed render enormous thanks to my Maecenas, but can repay in the smallest degree. Wherefore, whatever I am, I offer myself, dedicate and consecrate myself to his service. Nor indeed to him alone, but also to thee, my most eminent lord, for the most sure sign and evidence of my singular affection.

For, as I suspect, it is for no other cause that this little book of herbs and medicaments is so urgently asked for by thee, than to commend the Indians, though so unworthy, to his royal Sacred Caesarean Catholic majesty. Would that we might make a book worthy the kingís view, for this is certainly most unworthy of coming into the sight of so great majesty; but remember that we poor and unfortunate Indians are inferior to all mortals, and thus our insignificance and poverty implanted in us by nature, merit forbearance. Now therefore I pray, most magnificent Sir, that this little book which by every right I should have put in thy name, thou shalt in this spirit receive from the hand of thy servant, through which it is offered; or, what I should wonder not at, thou shouldst throw it away as it deserves. Farewell.

At Tlatelulco. In the year of the Savior our Lord, 1552.

Of thy Excellency the most devoted servant.


CONCLUSION:

Juan Badiano, interpreter to the honest reader, salutation.

Whatever the work brought together by me in the translation, such as it is, of this little book of plants, most excellent reader, again and again I beg that you will take with favor. Truly I had much rather this my labor had perished, than go under your most exact appraisement. You will further know that I have put a number of hours in succession into this edition, not thereby to show off my skill, which almost is nothing, but through the obedience which by highest right I owe to the sanctuary of St. James the Apostle and Patron of the Spaniards, as to its priests and superior the very reverend Franciscan father, friar Jacob de Grado, who laid this burden on my shoulders. Farewell in the Savior Christ. At Tlatilulco in the College of the Holy Cross, on feast day of St. Mary Magdalen, in the year of the redemption of the world, the fifteen hundred and fifty second.

The end of this little herbal book, to which Juan Badiano gave Latinity, Indian by nativity, a Xuchimilcan by country, teacher in the said college.

Glory be to him by whose grace I translated the book which you behold, good friend reader.
__________________
"Don't Demonstrate, Infiltrate! From within you can help those without." -Jorge Le Rand

"Tehan tohtocazqueh to tamatcayotl can cachi chicahuac." - David Vazquez
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 03-26-2011
20Chicahua11's Avatar
20Chicahua11 20Chicahua11 is offline
Travieso
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Everywhere
Posts: 327
Default Re: Our Ancestors and Medicine

I did a write up some years back on healing herbs and stones, I believe I posted it on my VERY OLD myspace page which I don't even know if it still is there, I'll have to look that up..., but I'm still studying and learning new herbs and plants like which are good for Diabetics, over all woman health and aura cleaning and blah blah yadda yadda lol btw thx Tec, you are a walking informational center...
__________________
If I were a bird I'd fly to you, if I were a star I'd shine for you, if I were a verse I'd rhyme for you, and one day you'll walk into my eyes!
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 03-27-2011
20Chicahua11's Avatar
20Chicahua11 20Chicahua11 is offline
Travieso
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Everywhere
Posts: 327
Default Re: Our Ancestors and Medicine

§ Herbs And Herbal Healing §

The Creator's Gift's To Us

Physical Description: Aloe looks much like a succulent cactus. Its leaves are usually elongated , frequently pointed, sometimes blotched or mottled. Some of them have spiny teeth on the leaves, and the flowers tend to be found on a single leafless stalk in clusters. Depending on the species, they can be in simple or in branched clusters. Also depending on the species, they can range from miniature house plants to a species which grows to 65 feet. Note, there is a plant referred to as American Aloe which is not a true aloe but a member of the agave family. Medicinal Properties: Aloe is most well known for its use in soothing burns by using its fresh juice. Note it also can soothe some insect bites. It can also be used externally as a dried powder which is applied to open running wounds (thickly) then covered with clean gauze. It absorbs the fluid, and encourages healthy tissue growth. Internally it can be used as a cleanser. Aloe should not be used internally by pregnant women or by folks with hemorrhoids.


Physical Description: Basil grows to about 2feet tall. Its leaves are oval, its flowers nestle in the axils (where the leaf stems join the stem), and it has a squarish stem. Some varieties the leaves may exhibit slightly toothed edges. Medicinal Properties: Basil contains an aromatic and volatile camphor bearing oil, which accounts for its use in cooking as well as in potpourris. Basil is thought to help allay mild nervous tension headaches and nausea. It is also known as a carminative (relieves gas) and to have some effect inhibiting the organisms that cause dysentery. Additionally, it was used during childbirth
(sometimes in conjunction with nutmeg) to ease childbirth and the dispelling of the placenta. This was used as a tea, a teaspoon of leaves used per cup of water, generally no more than two cups of tea used per day. Mystical Properties: Basil is believed to help create harmony. People wear it (one can use essential oil in a perfume, or crushed leaves in a pouch) to attract sympathetic responses and to help avoid clashes. (some say it will attract love) It was also common to grow the plant in pots to ensure a harmonious home.

Physical Description: Burdock grows from 2 to 5 feet tall, with stout spreading branches, and heart shaped leaves. It flowers in July and August with purple flowers. After the flowers have passed, they are replaced by the spherical burr. Medicinal Properties: Burdock is a diaphoretic and a diuretic. It is an excellent blood purifier. Its root (and sometimes the seed) is used in tea. Consequently it is prescribed to be taken as a tea for swollen lymph glands, liver ailments, kidney problems, rheumatoid arthritis, gout and skin problems. The fresh leaves are often used in a poultice applied to forehead and soles of feet for fever and gout. Fresh leaves shredded finely and mixed with stiffly beaten egg white creates a mixture used for burns. Mystical Properties: The roots of the burdock were gathered in the waning moon, cut into disks, dried and strung on red thread as beads to be used to ward off evil and negativity. It was also used in incenses for such.

Physical Description: Catnip is in the mint family, and it has the same squareness to its stem (cross section) as other mints. It can grow up to 3 feet tall the leaves are grayish downy almost heart-shaped oval leaves. The flowers are pale lavender to pale pink, and are found at the top of the plant. Medicinal Properties: Catnip has many uses. It is known to help prevent and dispel gas, and has been used for colicky babies (candied catnip leaves were used as an after dinner mint at one time). As a tea, it is best cooled before ingested as some people find it an emetic when drunk warm (emetic is something used to induce vomiting). When used medicinally, it is made as an infusion (tea made with water that is hot but NOT boiling, in an enclosed container, as the oils are very volatile). It is also thought to be calming. As a sedative one uses an ounce of the dried leaves per pint of water. Once cooled an adult dose is two tablespoons of the infusion, and the child's dose is 2 to 3 teaspoons. For an For upset stomach, use one teaspoon of the herb in a cup of water. Catnip is also used as a diaphoretic, which means it promotes sweating without inducing a fever. Fresh green catnip leaves bruised and applied to hemorrhoids or catnip juice made into an ointment for the same purpose is reputed to provide some relief. This plant was also used to bring on delayed menses.

Physical Description: Roman chamomile is a low growing perennial herb, but it can shoot up to 12 inches high when producing flower stems. The flowers look much like miniature daisies with large central golden discs. The leaves are light green finely divided (some herbals describe the leaves as feathery). Note German chamomile is a taller annual which grows two to three feet tall, and its flowers are smaller than the Roman chamomile. Medicinal Properties: Chamomile is used for upset stomachs, as an anti-inflammatory, and as a tranquilizer (some older herbal medicine books will call it a nervine because of
its calming effect on the nerves). Mothers used to make this tea to drink and to pass the calming agent on to cranky babies through their milk. Chamomile is also reputed to increase menstrual flow. The flowers are the part of the plant used. They contain calcium, glycoside, tannic acid, and anthelmic acid. Because the essential oil in chamomile is so volatile, it is steeped (10 to 15 minutes) in a covered container so not to have its essences lost to the atmosphere. 1 teaspoon of the flowers is used per cup of tea. (it is really a yummy tea, good with honey) Though this is not considered medicinal perse, it is also supposed to help repel insects (sponge the unsweetened tea over your body and let it dry) and to be an excellent rinse to bring out blonde highlights in hair. Mystical Properties: Chamomile's tranquilizing effect made it commonly used in incenses for relaxation into a meditative state (though sleep could also result). It was also used in prosperity charms to draw money - discs of gold, the idea of like draws like.

Physical Description: Black Cohosh is a 3-9ft tall perennial herb, with a simple stem and irregular leaves. It blooms May to August with small white flowers on wand-like racemes Blue Cohosh is a 1-3ft tall perennial found in moist areas. The leaves are 1 -3 inches long, is purple when young. It flowers in May and June, with yellowish green flowers. The seeds found on it in August were used to make a coffee like beverage. Medicinal Properties: Black cohosh was traditionally used as an emmenagogue, but was also known to be used as a astringent, diuretic, and diaphoretic (inducing sweating). Besides being
used for "womb troubles" it was used for kidney and digestive system, as well as for coughs (expectorant) and for slowing the pulse. Black Cohosh was also known as bugbane for its use as an insect repellent. Some believed it also to be helpful as an antidote to snakebite, and thus it also earned the name of Snakeroot. Blue cohosh was most known for its use as an aid to parturition. It was used as an emmenagogue.

Physical Description: Coltsfoot is a perennial which has dandelion-like flowers which precede the growth of leaves. The flower stalks have upward pointing scales. The leaves are rounded, slightly heart shaped (indentation by the heel of the colt's foot), leaf edges are a little serrated, and there are downy hairs on the underside of the young leaf (the down disappears as the leaf gets older). The plant sends out runners. It is found mainly in the northeast parts of the United States. Medicinal Properties: Coltsfoot contains mucilage (as well as some vitamin C, calcium and potassium). Historically in Europe it
was used in an herbal smoking mixture which contained buckbean, eyebright, betony, rosemary, thyme, lavender and chamomile. It also was made into a cough syrup (one ounce of dried leaves in a quart of water, then boiled down to a pint of water, strained then sweetened with honey, no more than a cup a day was to be taken). Coltsfoot tea acts as an expectorant. To make it, steep 1 teaspoon full of leaves per cup of water (steep for a half hour). Strain and flavor with honey (note: a horehound candy drop melted into the tea is also a good flavoring which enhances its expectorant properties). This tea can be taken two or three times daily. The aforementioned methods were used to alleviate coughs, asthma and bronchial congestion. The bruised leaves are were also used on skin wounds as a poultice. Mystical Properties: Coltsfoot was sometimes added to smoke mixtures used in ceremony, generally when a person was being introduced to the practice of ceremonial smoke. This was done to reduce the probability that the person would be embarrassed by coughing.

Physical Description: Dandelion is a perennial herb with basal leaves which are deeply toothed. The yellow flower is at the top of a hollow stem, and opens wide during the day, closing at night. The flower heads turn into downy balls which carry the seeds away in a breeze. There are several varieties of dandelion. Medicinal Properties: Dandelion is a aperient (mildly laxative) and a diuretic. It is also high in mineral content and is considered to be a blood builder. The root is used as a cleanser for kidneys, liver, pancreas and spleen. Being a blood and gland cleanser, it is also used to help clear some skin disorders. Mystical Properties: The roots of the dandelion were believed to promote one's psychic abilities. It was also believed that blowing on the seed head would divine the number of years one had left to live.

Physical Description: Dill is a hardy annual plant that looks much like fennel in many ways. It has a spindly tap root similar to fennel, but its root is not used. Dill has a round green main stem, with feathery branches. At the top it gets a cluster of umbels (the clusters look like up-side-down umbrellas) with yellow flowers at the tip of each umbel. It grows from 2 to 3 feet tall. Medicinal Properties: Dill has been used for insomnia due to indigestion, expelling gas (carminative), relieving hiccups, easing swelling and pains (used in poultices), and to increase milk production in nursing mothers. Its essential oils are Limonene and Carvone. It was used by bruising 2 teaspoons of dill seeds and leaves, then infusing them in a half pint of boiling water (covered), strain when cool, then take 2 ounces every hour or two until the condition is alleviated. Mystical Properties: Dill was believed to be a powerful charm protecting one against witchcraft. A bunch of dried dill was hung over the door for the purpose of protecting a household, or the seed heads were worn in sachets. Some also used dill in love sachets.

Physical Description: Echinacea has hairy leaves and stalk, and grows to about 2 feet tall. The leaves are oblong, and the center of the flower is a cone. Most species are a lavender or purple-rose color, but the white swan alba) species has white petals. Medicinal Properties: Echinacea root is used as an anti-inflammatory. The herb and the root are used for stimulating the immune system and as an antiseptic. It is also a diaphoretic (promotes sweating). The fresh leaves were chewed by Native Americans to relieve the pain of a toothache. The juice from the leaves is what causes the numbing (this is also purportedly why deer do not eat this plant, therefore survives in gardens where deer tend to destroy other plants). The numbing wears off fairly quickly. Mystical Properties: Echinacea was used to strengthen spells used in Witchcraft.

Physical Description: Fennel grows 4 to 6 feet tall with feathery leaves. It has small yellow flowers with five petals which are in flat topped clusters. The flowers are followed by grey green seeds which are about a quarter inch long. Medicinal Properties: Fennel seed is an appetite suppressant, anti-flatulent and expectorant. It is used for coughs, colds and bronchitis, as well as for indigestion. Fennel also promotes lactation in nursing mothers. The root is a diuretic and anti-flatulent. The root is used for gall bladder and liver problems as well as for rheumatism. Mystical Properties: Fennel was hung over doorways to repel evil spirits. Fennel was also used in purification rites.

Physical Description: Garlic is a perennial bulb comprised of small cloves. The plant can grow to two feet tall, and has flat long pointed leaves. Its flowers can range from white to pink. Medicinal Properties: Garlic contains vitamins A, B1, B2 and C. It also has a natural antibacterial property due to its essential oil allicin. Allicin is reputed to destroy the harmful bacteria (including staphylococci) without destroying the beneficial bacteria. Garlic is a vasodilator, thus helps relieve hypertension (high blood pressure). The 'recipes' for its use are numerous, only a few will be included herein. For a cold syrup, a pound of sliced garlic cloves were boiled in a closed container for about 12 hours. A decoction of vinegar in which caraway or fennel had been boiled was added to the mixture along with enough honey to make it syrupy. Some also utilized raw garlic juice for cough. For external wounds, a sterilized pad was soaked in diluted garlic juice and applied to the wound (note: sterilized sphagnum moss was used in the pre-cotton pad era). Garlic juice is also used to eliminate intestinal worms. To do so, one must first fast overnight and for the morning hours, then either raw garlic juice or milk in which garlic has been boiled is then ingested. Garlic also promotes sweating (diaphoretic) and is a diuretic (kidney stimulating, i.e. increases urination) and relieves gas pains (carminative - promotes expulsion of gas from the bowels). Also it is reputed to be an insect repellent, however you may find it repels your friends and loved ones too! (seriously though, you may want to plant it in strategic parts of your garden, but not next to roses, they do not like garlic). Parsley is reputed to help clear the odor of garlic on the breath. Mystical Properties: Garlic was believed to protect one from evil spirits (not just vampires) and to prevent one from drowning. Some also believed that carrying garlic on a journey ensured good weather for the trip.

Physical Description: Goldenrod is a perennial herb that grows from 20 to 40inches tall. It has very narrow smooth edged leaves which alternate up the stem of the plant. The leaves may be up to 5 inches long, and when crushed have a mild scent of anise. The odora species has upper branches with tiny yellow flower heads in a single row along the branch. Other species have larger clusters of flowers and may have sub-branching on the flower branches. Medicinal Properties: To make goldenrod tea, use one teaspoon of the flowers and/or leaves per cup of boiling water, steep covered, strain, then add honey to sweeten to taste. The goldenrod's flowers are known to be aperient (gently laxative) , astringent (causes contraction) and a stimulant good for eliminating kidney stones (generally for this purpose use
both flowers and leaves in a tea). The dried flowers are powdered to use on open wounds that do not heal. The goldenrod's leaves are known to be a stimulant, diuretic (increases urination) and carminative (gas relieving), when ingested warm, it also promotes sweating (diaphoretic). Goldenrod roots used as a poultice for toothache.

Physical Description: Golden seal is a perennial with a hairy stem 6 to 18 inches high. The hairy leaves alternate on the stem, and have either five or seven lobes. (he larger leaves being lower on the stem) The flowers are greenish white, a single flower per stem. The fruit is a red berry. Goldenseal has traditionally operated as a traditional healing herb of Native Americans but it has entered the European herbal cabinet with zeal. Traditionally, the Cherokee used goldenseal as an herbal treatment for indigestion, local inflammations, and to improve appetite. The Iroquois, meanwhile, used Goldenseal to treat heart problems, liver disorders, and whooping cough and to treat fevers. Goldenseal reached European shores around 1760. During the nineteenth century, Goldenseal had become a popular favorite with practitioners of the Eclectic and Thomsonian schools of medicine. In 1926, Goldenseal was included in the list of United States medicinal ingredients in the Pharmacopoeia.

The character of Goldenseal has alternately been described as bitter, dry, astringent, and cold. The plants constituents are described as resins, volatile oils, and alkaloids. Herbalists traditionally describe the actions of Goldenseal as astringent, a digestive and bile stimulant, a tonic, and a laxative. Goldenseal has also been used to reduce phlegm, to heal gastric mucous membranes, and to raise blood pressure

Physical Description: Hyssop has a long thin leaf that is a shiny green. The flowers are a blue to lavender color and are very attractive to bees. Some species of Hyssop have white or pink flowers. Hyssop is found in dry sunny areas, and grow to be 2 - 3 feet tall. Medicinal Properties: Hyssop leaves were used to improve complexion and to help coughs and colds when used as a tea. (as a tea it is fairly good tasting, somewhat licorice-like).

Physical Description: Junipers have grey green or blue green sharp needles (1/2 inch to 3/4 inch long) with berry like blue fruits that take 2 years to ripen. Many Junipers tend to be small or medium evergreens mostly used as ornamentals. However, the California juniper can reach the height of 40 feet. There are also forms of juniper that are low growing ground covers. Medicinal Properties: Juniper stimulates the appetite and digestion, helps eliminate mucus and thus helps eliminate coughs. It has a diuretic effect (stimulates the kidneys and bladder) and is a urinary antiseptic (therefore is useful in treating cystitis). A strong tea of the berries is considered to be helpful against the effects of bug bites (use the tea as a wash). For ingestion, an infusion is made by first soaking a few tablespoons of the berries in water, then adding them to a pint of boiling water, and infusing for at least a half hour. The resultant infusion should be divided into 4 equal doses to be taken in the course of a day. This infusion is also useful as a carminative (expelling gas), and as a vermifuge (deworming the intestine, ingest the infusion). Native Americans used a hot pack of needles, twigs and berries to be applied to aches. Note do NOT use juniper if pregnant as it is an emmenagogue (promotes menstrual flow). The infusion can also be used (by non pregnant women) as a douche to alleviate yeast infections. Also, if juniper is ingested frequently, it MAY produce temporary sterility in women. Mystical Properties: Juniper was regarded as protection against accidents, devils, evil spirits and wild animals. Juniper was also burned during childbirth to prevent fairies from substituting changelings. The berries were also strung to create an attraction love-charm. Others believe that the plant may protect a house from thieves perhaps if it is under windows the sharp needles provide a deterrent?

Physical Description: Lavender grows 2 to 3 feet tall, has gray green narrow leaves that are opposite each other. The flowers are clustered in 2 to 3 inch spikes at the tops of the stems and are Purplish Blue. Medicinal Properties: Lavender oil may be toxic, it is best not to ingest it, but if you feel you must, be sure not to take more than two drops of undiluted essential oil. Lavender has long been recognized as a sedative (used aromatically). Historically it was made into "Lavender water" which was ingested to dispel intestinal gas and as a gargle. Before the first world war it was also used externally as an antiseptic on wounds, as well as a vermifuge (dewormer). It is also a repellant for moths, flies and mosquitoes. Mystical Properties: Lavender has been traditionally used in purification bath rituals and in purification incenses. It is also reputed that carrying the herb will aid one in seeing ghosts.

Physical Description: Lemon verbena is a tender perennial herb which must be protected from frost. If you bring the plant indoors to winter, do not be alarmed if it loses its leaves, it is a deciduous plant. Lemon Verbena's leaves are generally in sets of three on a woody stem. The tiny flowers grow on spikes and are either pale lavender or white. The plant is easily identified when one touches or crushes the leaves; one will smell a strong lemon scent. Medicinal Properties: Lemon verbena was used for digestion, however it is also a mild sedative and febrifuge (cools fevers). It was most frequently used in a tea (infusion), made by steeping 1 tsp. dried leaves in a cup of boiling water (steep for 5 to 15 minutes) and drunk with honey after meals. Magical Properties: Lemon verbena was believed to be helpful in purification rituals (in bathwater for personal purification, and either in incense or scattered around for area purification). It was also worn to make oneself attractive to the opposite sex, or used in love spells.

Physical Description: Meadowsweet grows up to 6 feet tall. Its leaves are oval with teeth along the edges, and are paired along the stems. The leaves at the termination of branches have 3 lobes. The tiny creamy-white flowers grow in terminal clusters, have five petals, and are somewhat almond scented. Medicinal Properties: Meadowsweet has salicylates (think aspirin) and citric acid in the flower only and tannin throughout the plant. The flowers and leaves make a pleasant tasting tea. Meadowsweet is used for fevers, diarrhea, kidney problems, prostate problems and rheumatism. Mystical Properties: Meadowsweet was used in love spells.

Physical Description: Mugwort grows wild in North America. It grows 1 to 5 feet tall. The leaves are silvery white underneath and have 5 to 7 lobes. The leaves alternate up the stalk. The flowers are small, grow in clusters and range from yellow to purplish. Medicinal Properties: Taken internally as a tea, mugwort was used for colds, colic, kidney inflammation, rheumatism, fever and to bring on suppressed menses. A teaspoon of the leaves were used per cup of boiling water. Externally it is used in poultices for wounds and for poison oak. Mugwort is the ingredient in "moxi-sticks" used for moxibustion, which is a heat treatment of the tsubo (acupuncture) points. Mystical Properties: Mugwort tea was used before divinations, and the herb was used in sachets kept in a pillow to promote prophetic dreams and astral projection. Carrying mugwort was believed to prevent poisoning, sunstroke or harm from wild beasts. However carrying it was also believed to increase lust.

Physical Description: Mullein is a biennial which for the first year does not flower but merely has the large fuzzy basal leaves. Second year mullein has the very tall (frequently to 5 feet) stalk with pale yellow (white and sometimes purple) flowers set closely around the top of the stem. Medicinal Properties: Mulleinís chief uses are as a poultice, demulcent (soothes mucus membranes), expectorant and emollient, but it is also mildly sedative. If it was to be taken internally, it was combined with a strong spice to mask its scent and taste. It also has been used as a steam inhalant for clearing the sinuses. Native Americans used it in an herbal tobacco combination as a cough remedy (coltsfoot was one of the other ingredients). As a tea, one teaspoon of leaves is used per cup of boiling water. Up to 2 cups a day can
be taken. It was sometimes boiled with milk instead of water. As a poultice, the leaves are bruised or chopped. It can be used cool or warm to apply to the affected area, depending on the type and age of the injury. Modern laboratory testing has shown that there is some anti-inflammatory agent in this plant. Steeped with olive oil, mullein flowers were used to make a remedy for ear aches.

Physical Description: Parsley is a many branched, bright green, smooth stemmed herb which is a biennial. Its flowers are a greenish yellow. The various species differ mainly in the shape of the leaves. Medicinal Properties: Parsley is a diuretic used for kidney and bladder problems, as well as for the liver, gall bladder and spleen. As an internal cleanser, it is also useful in arthritis gout and prostate problems. For this, the roots and leaves are taken as a tea (2 to 4 cups a day) or in a tincture. It is also reputed to help the pituitary and thyroid. The seeds contain apiol which is considered to be a safe emmenagogue (used to bring on delayed menses). Some also believe that parsley is a good cancer preventative. Parsley is mildly laxative. It is also used as an expectorant, for coughs. As a hot poultice it is used to relieve insect bites and stings. Mystical Properties: In Roman times, parsley was used as a garnish to guard the food from contamination, or worn to provide protection. It was also used in purification baths. It was also believed that if eaten, it would promote lust.

Physical Description: Peppermint, like all mints has an erect, branching square stem. The leaves are a dark green, and the purplish flowers are on spikes. The perennial plants grow from 1 - 3 feet high. They flower from July to September. Sometimes the veins are a little 'hairy' but otherwise the stem is smooth. It is best to harvest this plant in the dry weather of August and September. Medicinal Properties: Peppermints leaves and stems are the parts used. It is used for nausea, vomiting and to help relieve intestinal gas. It is also used as a mild stimulant. It can also be helpful in the case of suppressed menstruation. Some say Peppermint is also helpful in cases of sea sickness. Magical Properties: Peppermint has been used in healing and purification spells, believed to raise the vibrations of an area. To this end, it was rubbed against furniture, walls and floorboards. It was used in pillows to promote sleep, and was believed to make the dreams pre-cognitive. It was also believed to be useful in mixtures for love spells.

Physical Description: Plantain major has a rosette of basal broad oval leaves and bears spikes of greenish flowers which turn to the familiar seed stalks. Hoary Plantain looks similar to the common plantain except the leaves are stalkless, and it has greenish pink flowers. English Plantain has longer narrower lance shaped leaves and greenish white flowers. The flower spikes can grow to be between one and two feet tall. Medicinal Properties: The seeds of this plant are high in mucilage, so they were made into a tea for diarrhea relief, bladder, kidney and stomach problems. The leaves are also high in tannin which acts as an astringent, and were used in poultices for cuts, sores, burns and insect bites. The mucilage in the leaves also provided some soothing. Some also used the leaf tea as a diuretic. Mystical Properties: It was believed that carrying a piece of the plantain root in oneís pocket prevented snake bites. The plant also was believed to be a general protection against evil spirits.

Physical Description: Raspberries grow on prickly canes that are generally erect, freely branched and about 3-4 ft long. The leaves are green on the top and grayish on the underside. The leaves are about 3 inches long by 2 inches wide, rounded bottoms, and have serrated edges. Medicinal Properties: Raspberries were considered an astringent, stimulant and tonic to the digestive and urinary systems. Raspberry liqueur was used as a cough syrup. The leaves of raspberries, used in a tea, were believed to relieve painful menses and regulate the flow. The tea was believed to help prevent miscarriages. Used in a douche it was believed to relieve leucorrhoea.

Physical Description: Rosemary is a tender perennial evergreen that grows two to four feet tall (reputed to grow as tall as 6 feet in Mediterranean climates). The evergreen leathery needles are dark green on top and lighter (silvery) on the undersides. The creeping variety is called Rosmarinus prostratus. The flowers form at the tips of the branches in spring and range from light to dark blue depending on the variety. Medicinal Properties: Rosemary is believed to strengthen the memory (students wore sprigs of it in their hair while studying in Ancient Greece), cure headaches, and help the restless to sleep (infuse an ounce of fresh leaves or a heaping teaspoon of dried leaves in a pint of water, add lemon and honey). Used externally it cures stiffness of joints (a gallon of dark rum and a pound and a half of fresh
rosemary are let to stand all night, then over low heat distill off 5 pints, this mixture can be used internally or externally and is referred to as Hungary Water, the dosage is a spoonful). Rosemary is often combined with Lavender for use in creating insect repellants. Additionally it is reputed to be effective against dandruff (for 24 hours infuse an ounce each of rosemary and sage in a pint of water, strain and add a teaspoon of powdered borax). Pharmacological research has validated the usage as a carminative (intestinal gas dispeller) and antispasmodic. Mystical Properties: In Christian tradition, Rosemary is used as a symbol of fidelity and remembrance in wedding and funerary ceremonies. It was also used in sachet for safe passage over water. It has also been used as an incense along with juniper for aiding in recuperation.

Physical Description: Sage is an evergreen perennial that can grow to about 2 feet high. Its leaves are grey-green and grow in opposite pairs. The flowers are violet-blue and are found at the ends of stems and branches. Medicinal Properties: Sage tea is used for reducing excessive sweating/lowering fever (give cold, as an infusion) , as a carminative (aids in gas expulsion), to bring on delayed menses and for reducing mothers milk when she is weaning her baby. In earlier times it was also reputed to help the memory, for head colds, also for joint pain. Mystical Properties: Sage was used in sachets for healing and prosperity. The smoke of sage, especially white sage, is said to be pleasing to good spirits. It is often used in smudging, sweat lodges, and many Native American rituals.

Physical Description: Slippery Elm has a rough bark (characteristic of the elm family). The leaves of this particular species of elm are sometimes rusty on the underside. The leaves are rough, serrated edges, and are a deep olive green with a yellowish tinge on the top, a lighter green underneath (except when tinged with rust). Medicinal Properties: The innermost layer of the bark was the part used medicinally. It is very mucilaginous and was used for soothing any inflamed surface of the body, interior or exterior. Some of the herb based lozenges sold today contain slippery elm.

Physical Description: Thyme has a woody perennial root from which many thin stems grow. The stems, if they survive winter, grow hard and twig like with age. The leaves are paired and tiny ovals. The flowers are pale purple. Note: Bees LOVE this herb. Medicinal Properties: Thyme has an essential oil, thymol which is a powerful preservative and antibacterial. Additionally Thyme is a diaphoretic (promotes sweating). As a tea, thyme is used for asthma, cramps, diarrhea, digestion, fever, flu, headache, heartburn, migraine headaches, nerves and lung problems. Use one teaspoon of the herb per cup
of boiling water. Steep covered for 10 minutes. It is also sometimes included as an ingredient in poultices (because of its antibacterial properties). Mystical Properties: Thyme was believed to attract good health (it was either worn or used in healing spells). It was put under the pillow to ensure restful sleep. It was burned in temples and used in purification baths. Also, carrying and smelling the herb was supposed to bolster oneís courage.

Personal Note: Please be careful when using herbs, before using any herbs educate yourself and don't try to substitute herbs for seeing a professional doctor at least once a year. Can you overdose on herbs? Yes you can and you can seriously harm yourself, and others if not well educated on how to use, mix or prepare them. Be safe, live well, eat healthy and replace good foods like fresh vegetables, and fruits for junk foods and snacks. (I need to say this to myself 1,000 times a day LOL)....

I've come across a really neat website that I personally like as it goes into VIVID detail about many herbs check it out! http://www.herbwisdom.com/ There are tons just do a search using the words healing herbs happy hunting!
__________________
If I were a bird I'd fly to you, if I were a star I'd shine for you, if I were a verse I'd rhyme for you, and one day you'll walk into my eyes!
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 03-30-2011
tecpaocelotl's Avatar
tecpaocelotl tecpaocelotl is offline
The one and only
Presidente
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Cali
Posts: 27,689
Send a message via AIM to tecpaocelotl Send a message via MSN to tecpaocelotl Send a message via Yahoo to tecpaocelotl Send a message via Skype™ to tecpaocelotl
Default Re: Our Ancestors and Medicine

Great article, but most of the stuff in that article looks like plants from the "old world".
__________________
"Don't Demonstrate, Infiltrate! From within you can help those without." -Jorge Le Rand

"Tehan tohtocazqueh to tamatcayotl can cachi chicahuac." - David Vazquez
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 03-30-2011
Bante's Avatar
Bante Bante is offline
Prospect
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 21
Default Re: Our Ancestors and Medicine

Quote:
Originally Posted by tecpaocelotl View Post
Great article, but most of the stuff in that article looks like plants from the "old world".
There are a couple of common and traditional varieties of mint found here in the "new world" that I didn't see listed.

One of them is the monarda aka horsemint. It's supposed to also be good for aches.

Another is called "toronjil" in Southern TX , even though that name in Mexico refers to a different type of plant. Does anyone know which herb I'm talking about? Back in the day, a lot of grandmas would make tea for drinking out of it.

Last edited by Bante; 03-30-2011 at 10:09 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Our Ancestors Were the First Chemists Of the World!.... MexicaPride Cultural Issues 6 11-19-2013 09:22 AM
Over the counter medicine OR grandma's old remedy's? LatinKing General Health 26 08-07-2005 09:49 PM
Finding wisdom through our ancestors runakuna Religion 5 12-22-2003 05:10 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:50 PM.


All the comments are property of their posters. Images, logo, content and design are © copyright by SoyChicano.com. All Rights Reserved.