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  #1  
Old 05-30-2007
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Default Film buffs

I used to do a lot of film editing and some filming when I was at UCSB. I did my work on Final Cut Pro.

I'm thinking about getting back into it. Probably starting with my cheap ass little sony camcorder, but eventually I want to get a professional grade like a canon Xlh1. Do people have suggestions? Anyone know about film and resources on technique?
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Old 06-04-2007
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Default Re: Film buffs

suggestions on what? how to film? how to edit? how to make a movie?

I guess what I am asking is for you to be more specific about what it is you want to know. I'll be more than happy to help you out.
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Old 06-04-2007
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Default Re: Film buffs

SJ asks relavant questions.

But are you asking shooting techniques? On that u have to look at say movies and things with your camera and the respurces around you to get a shooting style. Your own shooting style can kind of make a film. But not only that, it depends on what film or movie your shooting for that helps define what techinque/ style your going to use.
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Old 06-06-2007
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Default Re: Film buffs

Mostly on what type of camera to get. shooting style and all that bs I'm sure I'll learn along the way. But I want resources on what makes a good camera good and what I should look for. I'll mostly be making home videos and movies, so that stuff doesn't really concern me. But I do want to get good quality video. I'm sure I want 3ccd's, and manual focus. I'd like a good indepth analysis on equipment.
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Old 06-06-2007
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Default Re: Film buffs

what is your budget?

for a consumer level camera, you should go with the canon HV20. It's getting a lot of great reviews.


It is an HDV cam and for the money it is well spent.

If you want a professional level or prosumer camera where you plan on making a good product/profit. You can stick with canon and go the XL H1 or higher but the price difference is significant. If all you are going to shoot is home videos then these cams are overkill.

You could also go with the panasonic cams since they do 24p very well. 24p = film like motion. They also have the ability to use p2 cards, which means no tape...which means faster transfer times for editing.

Or you can go the sony route and pick up sony v1. I have it's cousin the fx1.


I absolutely love it. It's HDV and it's my workhorse when it comes to my business. But for home movies, it might be a little silly carrying around this camera to family events. I'll usually take my vx2100 for things like that but I really want to pick up a consumer level cam that is small and I can carry around for home movies.

Canon is the better route because of it's interchangeable lens but it's significantly more expensive. panasonic is a great choice for it's 24p capabilities. Sony is overall a good camera. Like I said, I love mine and I have been very happy with it.

But again, it depends on your budget and what it is you want.

things to look for? I'd definately tell you to go with a 3ccd chip and nowadays go with HDV. Even if you don't have an HD set, you will see picture quality improvements. Plus why not start capturing HD now, so that later when you do have an HD set, you will have footage that will look good.
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Old 06-06-2007
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Default Re: Film buffs

Oh, you just want advice on camera's. I am not to much up on cameras. I know a few that i have looked at that i wouldnt mind getting, but i dont know exaaaaaactly what they are. Panasonics are good. Canons are good as well. I think there is one type of JVC that is not bad at all.
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Old 06-06-2007
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Default Re: Film buffs

I don't have a budget yet. I haven't done any film at all in a while. I own a little shitty Sony DCR type camcorder at the moment, which is good to get started again, but not something I want to keep in the long run. Eventually I'd like to get something much better. My Fiance loves photography he just got a canon SLR 5D. He's thinking about doing some weddings in the future and brought up the idea of me doing the video. He saw the canon Xlh1 and thought that would be great, but it's extremely expensive so we were thinking more along the lines of the Canon GL2, but I'm noticing that it is not HDV. I'm not familiar with HDV, what is that exactly? and 24p does that mean that it's at a similar speed as 35mm film? The DSLR my fiance got has the same speed and quality as a 35mm film camera, does something similar exist for digital film? I think I do definitely want to stick to canon, what are the advantages and disadvantages of that? (I know you mentioned some--like interchangeable lenses, can you really change the lenses?) And is the price of a canon worth it?

I know this is a lot of questions, if you have time to answer them yourself please do, if not then I would really like some references that can point me on the right track if you could share some with me.
Aside for the occasional wedding/event that we might do, I'll mostly use it for the home, which is why I emphasized that in my last post.

Thanks!
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Old 06-06-2007
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Default Re: Film buffs

Quote:
Originally Posted by megustahoy View Post
He saw the canon Xlh1 and thought that would be great, but it's extremely expensive so we were thinking more along the lines of the Canon GL2,
The gl2 is a great camera. If you don't go the HDV route then I would suggest a vx2100 over the gl2. Especially if you want to do event videography. The vx2100 blows the gl2 out of the water, when it comes to low light performance which is very important in wedding work because reception halls are dark and so are churches. Gl2 you get a dark, murky picture while with the vx2100 you get a very acceptable image.

Quote:
but I'm noticing that it is not HDV. I'm not familiar with HDV, what is that exactly?
HDV is high definition recording on a standard DV signal. Standard DV is 720x480(or 480i) and HDV is 1440x1080(or 1080i). What does it mean? it means more screen resolution which results in a better picture.

Quote:
and 24p does that mean that it's at a similar speed as 35mm film?
Standard video runs at 29.97 frames a second. Any time we see a home movie, or some news footage we see 29.97 frames of interlaced video.

when talking about 24p, it means you are working with 720x480 progressive frames(not interlaced). That run at 24 frames per second. Film is shot at 24 frames per second so you get a film-like motion out of 24p cameras. 24P gives your footage a cinematic feel.

If you want your video to feel like film and/or plan to film out(transfer video to film) then a 24p camera is the right way to go. Of course there are many other important considerations to get a video look like film. Frame rate is one but then there is also resolution, depth of field and gamma range.

Just to make things clear. Remember that when talking about 24p, you are talking about frame rate(24 frames per second) and when comparing HDV with StandardDefinition, you are talking about more resolution.

Quote:
The DSLR my fiance got has the same speed and quality as a 35mm film camera, does something similar exist for digital film?
There are many movies shot on HD now. Robert Rodriguez works exclusively with HD cameras(sin city, once upon a time in mexico) and has sworn never to shoot film again. However, his cameras are well over 100k.

But technology is catching up and today's HDV cameras are very capable of producing high quality movies. It comes down to talent, more so than the equipment you are working with.
Quote:
I think I do definitely want to stick to canon, what are the advantages and disadvantages of that? (I know you mentioned some--like interchangeable lenses, can you really change the lenses?) And is the price of a canon worth it?
For event work, I wouldn't bother going the canon route. I'd stick with sony. If you insist on going the canon route, pick up a gl2 but prepared to properly light it and keep in mind that in event work, that is not always possible(strict churches, strict reception halls) I would highly suggest a camera that does well under low light conditions(sony's vx2100)

Interchangeable lenses, won't cut it for event work. They are wonderful tools for filmmakers but won't be much of use to someone doing weddings. You don't have the time to be switching out lenses. Also lenses aren't cheap. So prepare to pay even more money on top of the camera to get a good quality lens.

Quote:
I know this is a lot of questions, if you have time to answer them yourself please do, if not then I would really like some references that can point me on the right track if you could share some with me.
I don't mind answering. videography is a passion of mine and I can talk about it all day. I've been in this business for a bit over 8 years now and I like helping people get started.

Last edited by SJ; 06-06-2007 at 04:11 PM.
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