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  #26  
Old 06-01-2008
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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Originally Posted by Quimix View Post
They wouldn't get too far with that bullshit. These people aren't stupid.
I know, but i'm wondering how they will react if someone goes over there, at least another indigenous from another tribe, what language could they possibly speak, can we find someone that speaks that language. would they be like all territorial and just kill on sight? Can we communicate with them and just let them know that we are around and if they ever need any help, we'll bring support 24/7.

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Originally Posted by Quimix
First off these people are not subhuman, you need to quit that condescending bullshit. I'm sure they have a general sense of whats going on. Invaders on their land, jungle being deforested,etc. that's probably why they are hiding out deep in the jungles. The Andean nations are arguably the oldest and deepest civilizations in the world, they are very slick people in their own right. They have an extensive network of communication.

Vanish? If anyone's gonna vanish its gonna be us people here living in an "advanced society." So advanced that, collectively, we are destroying the planet and everyone is at the brink of war with each other.
well yea, i'm not saying that they will catch something by themselves, but something is going to catch them. It's just a matter of time, which probably isn't long, I doubt people will stop deforesting and building cities fill them up with an infected population of all sorts of diseases. They say that about over a 100 uncontacted trives still exist, but there were even more, do we know how they dissappeared, could we've done something, besides stop invading...

Unless they have some special type of immune sytem way stronger than ours over here in the cities, they will be vulnarble either once they run out of space, or nead to spread out. Would it be a good idea to shut down Brazil or the whole continent of South America, lock it up and just leave it to these indegenous people, so that they can grow and expand.

I don't believe that people are going to quit and leave those guys alone, I doubt it'll happen. Just that they made it in the news and their location is now known, they will be like an exibit at the museum. People will start paying to fly over there and see them for themselves and take pictures. People might even throw an ipod or iphone and show them rock music and the presidential debates on youtube...Modern sociaty is just way to strong, too big, and too ignorant.
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Old 06-01-2008
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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I know, but i'm wondering how they will react if someone goes over there, at least another indigenous from another tribe, what language could they possibly speak, can we find someone that speaks that language. would they be like all territorial and just kill on sight? Can we communicate with them and just let them know that we are around and if they ever need any help, we'll bring support 24/7.
If they are chilln in the forest ,ready with spears, and have avoided colonization for 500+ years I doubt they need some help to survive.
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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If they are chilln in the forest ,ready with spears, and have avoided colonization for 500+ years I doubt they need some help to survive.
so is time frozen? I doubt it, time is changing faster every time/second, modern society is changing and growing at skyrocketing rates. With in those 500+ years, maybe the first quarter of that time range, it was nearly impossible to find them and colonize them, but start looking at the last quarter, you got helicopters, GPS, infrared imaging, satellites, weapons of mass destruction including biological. They can't hide anymore, especaily that their forests are getting and probalby going to get smaller in near time. Just like they're finding lost ruins in Guatemala destruction of villages in Africa all by satellites...Right now, If the wrong people get hold of the resources, time(which much isn't needed), and money, they could be doomed...lets say i'm an evil guy, I'll send in choppers over there, fly in bulldozers, make a road, put metal and electric gates around their villages, bring in christains to rape them into christainity..ect. You couldn't do that 250 to 375 years ago, at least not that easy and quickly.
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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This is how Indigenous of the Americas would be if Europeans hadn't come here and they could've remained isolated.
Oh yeah? Why do you say that?
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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Oh yeah? Why do you say that?
All isolated tribal people found in the last 200 years that I've ever heard of lived in similar ways. Even ones who live near Europeans- like the Sami in Norway- have chosen to live in a similar way to their ancestors. They either mixed in with the White Norweigens or lived the same kind of life with the other Sami as they always had. Do you know of an example that is greatly different?

Anyway, I hope people leave them alone and leave what's left of the rainforest alone. I guess that's too much to expect/
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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All isolated tribal people found in the last 200 years that I've ever heard of lived in similar ways. Even ones who live near Europeans- like the Sami in Norway- have chosen to live in a similar way to their ancestors. They either mixed in with the White Norweigens or lived the same kind of life with the other Sami as they always had. Do you know of an example that is greatly different?

Anyway, I hope people leave them alone and leave what's left of the rainforest alone. I guess that's too much to expect/
So you're saying that the "Indigenous of the Americas" were isolated? If so, your hypothesis is greatly flawed. The various peoples of the pre-Columbian Americas were certainly not isolated from one another. Now, if your not suggesting that "Indigenous of the Americas" were isolated from one another, then to have yet to answer why you think the indigenous peoples of pre-Columbian would be like those photographed had it not been for the coming of the Europeans.
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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So you're saying that the "Indigenous of the Americas" were isolated? If so, your hypothesis is greatly flawed. The various peoples of the pre-Columbian Americas were certainly not isolated from one another. Now, if your not suggesting that "Indigenous of the Americas" were isolated from one another, then to have yet to answer why you think the indigenous peoples of pre-Columbian would be like those photographed had it not been for the coming of the Europeans.
So how far across this hemisphere did they go and which tribes and peoples were in contact with each other and in what time periods and how can we know? I'm sure they had various relationships with other tribes in their area- but weren't they on foot? They didn't have horses until the Spanish came?

All the isolated or semi isolated tribal people I've heard of found within the last couple of hundred years- whether on islands or whatever have lived similar lives- living off the land in ways that seem to come from many centuries ago. I'm sure there are variences. I thought it was interesting that the Sami of Norway lived in structures like teepees such as many US Natives did. Maybe they all came from the same original place. If you know of exceptions I would be interested to know. I see that people in the early Americas lived somewhat differently from region to region- but to me they seemed more alike in the general ways that they lived than vastly different. That's why I assume that the other tribes would have stayed much the same as well. I don't know of examples to the contrary, do you?
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  #33  
Old 06-01-2008
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Hey Preachers! Leave the Children of Mother Earth and the Sun Alone!

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  #34  
Old 06-01-2008
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

^ Were you or anyone else able to play that song "Another Brick in the Wall" by Pink Floyd that I posted? I deleted the post because I couldn't get it to play on my pc
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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^ Were you or anyone else to play that song Another Brick in the Wall by Pink Floyd that I posted? I deleted it because I couldn't get it to play on my pc

No, I didn't see it I like that song. I like a lot of old songs.
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  #36  
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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So how far across this hemisphere did they go and which tribes and peoples were in contact with each other and in what time periods and how can we know? I'm sure they had various relationships with other tribes in their area- but weren't they on foot? They didn't have horses until the Spanish came?

All the isolated or semi isolated tribal people I've heard of found within the last couple of hundred years- whether on islands or whatever have lived similar lives- living off the land in ways that seem to come from many centuries ago. I'm sure there are variences. I thought it was interesting that the Sami of Norway lived in structures like teepees such as many US Natives did. Maybe they all came from the same original place. If you know of exceptions I would be interested to know. I see that people in the early Americas lived somewhat differently from region to region- but to me they seemed more alike in the general ways that they lived than vastly different. That's why I assume that the other tribes would have stayed much the same as well. I don't know of examples to the contrary, do you?
Well, before we get any further from what you had previously mentioned, let's just focus on what you wrote:

Lua: This is how Indigenous of the Americas would be if Europeans hadn't come here and they could've remained isolated.

Observer: Why do you say that?

Lua: All isolated tribal people found in the last 200 years that I've ever heard of lived in similar ways.

First, the different peoples of the Americas weren't "isolated." So, I'm not sure why you'd say that. Second, you stated that, but for the arrival of [western] Europeans, the pre-Columbian indigenous peoples of the Americas would still exist in a state like those photographed. Now, you don't really explain what you mean by "this how they would be," but it seems clear you mean (if you meant something else, please explain) to imply that indigenous peoples would be today nomadic hunters who, basically, lived in the "stone-age." Of course, there were many sedentary peoples in the Americas before the arrival of Europeans (which already gives reason to doubt your hypothesis). Add to that, that some of indigenous peoples had been working with metals, and I think it would be fair to say that parts of pre-Columbian America, at least, were on the verge of entering the "bronze age." So again, I cannot see why you'd suggest that indigenous peoples of the Americas would today be living in the state of those people in the photograph.

And it's odd that you'd think, but for Europeans, the people that populated Americas would still be living in societies of "hunter-gatherers." A pre-Columbian people of the Americas had developed their own writing system. It is my understanding that the Europeans did not; they were the benefactors of the Sumerian technology of Cuneiform (written words). Since the Maya had developed their own form of writing, who is to say that that technology wouldn't have spread and fueled other technological advances?

But again, I'm interested in you explaining why you think "this is how Indigenous of the Americas would be if Europeans hadn't come."

As for your questions of: how far across this hemisphere did they go and which tribes and peoples were in contact with each other and in what time periods, you'll have to do your own research. I am aware that there was extensive trade between the peoples of the pre-Columbian Americas.

Here's a video (that was put up my our resident Indian, tecpattle, in another thread), it talks about trade between people (Anasazi) from what is now called the south-west US and people (Toltec) from what is now called central Mexico.

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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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Well, before we get any further from what you had previously mentioned, let's just focus on what you wrote:

Lua: This is how Indigenous of the Americas would be if Europeans hadn't come here and they could've remained isolated.

Observer: Why do you say that?

Lua: All isolated tribal people found in the last 200 years that I've ever heard of lived in similar ways.

First, the different peoples of the Americas weren't "isolated." So, I'm not sure why you'd say that. Second, you stated that, but for the arrival of [western] Europeans, the pre-Columbian indigenous peoples of the Americas would still exist in a state like those photographed. Now, you don't really explain what you mean by "this how they would be," but it seems clear you mean (if you meant something else, please explain) to imply that indigenous peoples would be today nomadic hunters who, basically, lived in the "stone-age." Of course, there were many sedentary peoples in the Americas before the arrival of Europeans (which already gives reason to doubt your hypothesis). Add to that, that some of indigenous peoples had been working with metals, and I think it would be fair to say that parts of pre-Columbian America, at least, were on the verge of entering the "bronze age." So again, I cannot see why you'd suggest that indigenous peoples of the Americas would today be living in the state of those people in the photograph.

And it's odd that you'd think, but for Europeans, the people that populated Americas would still be living in societies of "hunter-gatherers." A pre-Columbian people of the Americas had developed their own writing system. It is my understanding that the Europeans did not; they were the benefactors of the Sumerian technology of Cuneiform (written words). Since the Maya had developed their own form of writing, who is to say that that technology wouldn't have spread and fueled other technological advances?

But again, I'm interested in you explaining why you think "this is how Indigenous of the Americas would be if Europeans hadn't come."

As for your questions of: how far across this hemisphere did they go and which tribes and peoples were in contact with each other and in what time periods, you'll have to do your own research. I am aware that there was extensive trade between the peoples of the pre-Columbian Americas.

Here's a video (that was put up my our resident Indian, tecpattle, in another thread), it talks about trade between people (Anasazi) from what is now called the south-west US and people (Toltec) from what is now called central Mexico.



I suppose I'm going on things I have learned about all the non European tribal people I have known of who have remained undisturbed until a later time- later than the 1800s- even if other types of people were near. I have never heard of any who created the same kind of technology on their own. Maybe you know of some. For example the Inuits were living a very different way in 1900 than the Scandanavians even though they lived in similar climates. Anyway there's no way to know how people would have progressed if their histories hadn't been interupted. All I go by is other tribes in various situations. If you know of some who progressed differently I would be interested to know. So I should have said it's my opinion. There is no way to know for certain. I am glad to learn new things.

I have been to Yucatan and Chichen Itza and it was amazing, except that most everything the guide talked about had to do with human sacrifice. It's odd that the people so mysteriously left there and there wasn't anything so advanced at a later time?
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Old 06-02-2008
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Default Amazon tribe sighting raises dilemma

Link to video footage: http://www.youtube. com/watch? v=E_1GhIjn8fY&eurl=http:// news.google. com/news? client=firefox- a&rls=org.mozilla% 3Aen-US%3Aoffici al&hl=en&tab=wn&ned=&qiurl=http:/ /i.ytimg. com/vi/E_ 1GhIjn8fY/ default.jpg

Amazon tribe sighting raises dilemma
http://africa. reuters.com/ world/news/ usnN30422358. html

Fri 30 May 2008, 16:26 GMT


By Stuart Grudgings
RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) - Dramatic photographs of previously unfound Amazon Indians have highlighted the precariousness of the few remaining "lost" tribes and the dangers they face from contact with outsiders.

The bow-and-arrow wielding Indians in the pictures released on Thursday are likely the remnants of a larger tribe who were forced deeper into the forest by encroaching settlement, experts said.


Rather than being "lost", they have likely had plenty of contact with other indigenous groups over the years, said Thomas Lovejoy, an Amazon expert who is president of The Heinz Center in Washington.

"I think there is an ethical question whether you can in the end keep them from any contact and I think the answer to that is no," Lovejoy said.

"The right answer is to have the kind of contact and change that the tribes themselves manage the pace of it."
The Brazil-Peru border area is one of the world's last refuges for such groups, with more than 50 uncontacted tribes thought to live there out of the estimated 100 worldwide.

They are increasingly at risk from development, especially on the Peruvian side which has been slower than Brazil to recognize protected areas for indigenous people.
Jose Carlos Meirelles, an official with Brazil's Indian protection agency who was on the helicopter that overflew the tribe, said they should be left alone as much as possible.

"While we are getting arrows in the face, it's fine," he told Brazil's Globo newspaper. "The day that they are well-behaved, they are finished."
Contact with outsiders has historically been disastrous for Brazil's Indians, who now number about 350,000 compared to up to 5 million when the first Europeans arrived.

"In 508 years of history, out of the thousands of tribes that exist none have adapted well to society in Brazil," said Sydney Possuelo, a former official with Brazil's Indian protection agency who founded its isolated tribes department.

CONCERN OVER PERU POLICY
In recent years, though, tribes like the Yanomami have succeeded in winning greater protection by becoming more politically organized and forming links with foreign conservationists.

"It's not about making that decision for them. It's about making time and space to make that decision themselves," said David Hill of the Survival International group.
More than half of the Murunahua tribe in Peru died of colds and other illness after they were contacted as a result of development for the first time in 1996, Hill said.

Sightings of such tribes are not uncommon, occurring once every few years in the Brazil-Peru border area where there are estimated to be more than 50 out of the total global number of 100 uncontacted tribes.
In 1998, a 200-strong tribe was discovered by Possuelo living in huts under the forest canopy, also in Acre state near the Brazil-Peru border.

In September last year, ecologists looking for illegal loggers in Peru spotted a little-known nomadic tribe deep in the Amazon.
The sighting underscored worries among rights groups that oil and gas exploration being pushed by the Peruvian government, as well as logging, is putting tribes at risk.

Peru has no equivalent to Brazil's long-standing Indian affairs department, which has a policy of no contact with unknown tribes.
"There is a lot of logging going on over on the Peruvian side," Hill said. "It's had all kinds of effects on the groups living there, particularly on the uncontacted groups -- it's led to violent conflicts and deaths."

In May, Peru's petroleum agency Perupetro said it would exclude areas where isolated tribes live from an auction of oil and gas concessions. Perupetro had been under pressure to limit exploration activities near tribal areas, and had cast doubt on the existence of isolated groups, angering activists.
(Additional reporting by Pedro Fonseca in Rio and Terry Wade in Lima; editing by Angus MacSwan)



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http://ap.google. com/article/ ALeqM5iRk0QGW- Tz0q6PP7y36N3CwO gH_wD9105MUG0
Brazil says uncontacted Amazon tribe threatened

By MICHAEL ASTOR – 2 days ago
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil (AP) — Brazil's government agreed to release stunning photos of Amazon Indians firing arrows at an airplane so that the world can better understand the threats facing one of the few tribes still living in near-total isolation from civilization, officials said Friday.
Anthropologists have known about the group for some 20 years but released the images now to call attention to fast-encroaching development near the Indians' home in the dense jungles near Peru.

"We put the photos out because if things continue the way they are going, these people are going to disappear," said Jose Carlos Meirelles, who coordinates government efforts to protect four "uncontacted" tribes for Brazil's National Indian Foundation.
Shot in late April and early May, the foundation's photos show about a dozen Indians, mostly naked and painted red, wielding bows and arrows outside six grass-thatched huts.

Meirelles told The Associated Press in a phone interview that anthropologists know next to nothing about the group, but suspect it is related to the Tano and Aruak tribes.
Brazil's National Indian Foundation believes there may be as many as 68 "uncontacted" groups around Brazil, although only 24 have been officially confirmed.

Anthropologists say almost all of these tribes know about western civilization and have sporadic contact with prospectors, rubber tappers and loggers, but choose to turn their backs on civilization, usually because they have been attacked.
"It's a choice they made to remain isolated or maintain only occasional contacts, but these tribes usually obtain some modern goods through trading with other Indians," said Bernardo Beronde, an anthropologist who works in the region.
Brazilian officials once tried to contact such groups. Now they try to protectively isolate them.

The four tribes monitored by Meirelles include perhaps 500 people who roam over an area of about 1.6 million acres (630,000 hectares).
He said that over the 20 years he has been working in the area, the number of "malocas," or grass-roofed huts, has doubled, suggesting that the policy of isolation is working and that populations are growing.

Remaining isolated, however, gets more complicated by the day.
Loggers are closing in on the Indians' homeland — Brazil's environmental protection agency said Friday it had shut down 28 illegal sawmills in Acre state, where these tribes are located. And logging on the Peruvian border has sent many Indians fleeing into Brazil, Meirelles said.
"On the Brazilian side we don't have logging yet, but I'd like to emphasize the 'yet,'" he said.

A new road being paved from Peru into Acre will likely bring in hordes of poor settlers. Other Amazon roads have led to 30 miles (50 kilometers) of rain forest being cut down on each side, scientists say.
While "uncontacted" Indians often respond violently to contact — Meirelles caught an arrow in the face from some of the same Indians in 2004 — the greater threat is to the Indians.

"First contact is often completely catastrophic for "uncontacted" tribes. It's not unusual for 50 percent of the tribe to die in months after first contact," said Miriam Ross, a campaigner with the Indian rights group Survival International. "They don't generally have immunity to diseases common to outside society. Colds and flu that aren't usually fatal to us can completely wipe them out."

Survival International estimates about 100 tribes worldwide have chosen to avoid contact, but said the only truly uncontacted tribe is the Sentinelese, who live on North Sentinel island off the coast of India and shoot arrows at anyone who comes near.

Last year, the Metyktire tribe, with about 87 members, was discovered in a densely jungled portion of the 12.1-million- acre (4.9-million- hectare) Menkregnoti Indian reservation in the Brazilian Amazon, when two of its members showed up at another tribe's village.
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Old 06-02-2008
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Default Re: Amazon tribe sighting raises dilemma

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It's not unusual for 50 percent of the tribe to die in months after first contact,"


thats sad! Especially thinking what are the chances that they will be left alone, after this exposure. Does the govt. really help them?
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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Originally Posted by Nelio View Post
No, we really wouldnt. Some, yes, but we probably wouldnt have. We had some sofisticated peoples living no these 2 continents. Not only that they were also a trading type of people. SO eventually trade would have spread and trade spreading is a good thing and it would have passed on the different technologies that were going on, ect.
And you know this how again?



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Originally Posted by El Californio View Post
You're coconut ass would say something like that
lol no seas mamon!!! =) pssst.... cambiate el pañal indio sucio que ya lo trais todo cagado! lol

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Originally Posted by Lua View Post
I have been to Yucatan and Chichen Itza and it was amazing, except that most everything the guide talked about had to do with human sacrifice. It's odd that the people so mysteriously left there and there wasn't anything so advanced at a later time?
Lua you are correct, I had the same experience at Chichen-Itza!
But you have to believe these true "Natives" on this website, because they know more than the natives who still live there! lol
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thanks, but i have no car and no money. i think it's just her time. she's already 10 yrs old so, she is an old lady.
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Old 06-02-2008
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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Originally Posted by 93FLEETWOOD View Post
They should send undercover agents dresses as indigenous and take pictures of all of them, and record their way of living and stuff....
Or better yet, leave them alone..

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Originally Posted by 93FLEETWOOD View Post
It would be great to preserve them, osea leave them alone to go on with their daily business, but i think it would be very difficult in the future, because they are being surrounded by infections all over, and I think everyday they are being squeezed in even tighter, that one of them might wonder off a few miles and discover a road, cars, buldings, ect.. and in contact with an invisible weapon. It would be great if they were living in thier own planet, say if phoenix finds living organisms on Mars or something, than they should be left alone, since possible threat are like millions of miles away in bubble of killer atmospheres...So it's just difficult to just leave them alone like this, anytime they could vanish without us noticing...So maybe it's kinda like a debate about a person on life support...



...and all we're going to see is drawings on rocks, showing a wierd flying object, kinda like a giant dragon fly that brings loud and rapid thunder, but no rain...
I was going to say WTF, but I see this has already been addressed by other posters.. still, WTF!?

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Originally Posted by Lua View Post
I suppose I'm going on things I have learned about all the non European tribal people I have known of who have remained undisturbed until a later time- later than the 1800s- even if other types of people were near. I have never heard of any who created the same kind of technology on their own. Maybe you know of some. For example the Inuits were living a very different way in 1900 than the Scandanavians even though they lived in similar climates. Anyway there's no way to know how people would have progressed if their histories hadn't been interupted. All I go by is other tribes in various situations. If you know of some who progressed differently I would be interested to know. So I should have said it's my opinion. There is no way to know for certain. I am glad to learn new things.

I have been to Yucatan and Chichen Itza and it was amazing, except that most everything the guide talked about had to do with human sacrifice. It's odd that the people so mysteriously left there and there wasn't anything so advanced at a later time?

I've been reading over your posts and responses to other posters and all I've been able to conclude is that perhaps you simply do not know much on the subject.
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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Originally Posted by Lua View Post
I suppose I'm going on things I have learned about all the non European tribal people I have known of who have remained undisturbed until a later time- later than the 1800s- even if other types of people were near. I have never heard of any who created the same kind of technology on their own. Maybe you know of some.
I'm not sure what you're saying here.
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Originally Posted by Lua View Post
Anyway there's no way to know how people would have progressed if their histories hadn't been interupted....So I should have said it's my opinion. There is no way to know for certain.
Even if you had wrote "it's my opinion," that wouldn't have changed the discussion; I still would have asked, "why do you hold that opinion." I mean, I knew it was your opinion, what I have been asking is: why do you hold the opinion that Europeans were the only way that pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas would advance from "hunter-gatherer" societies? Can/will you answer that?
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Old 06-02-2008
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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I'm not sure what you're saying here.Even if you had wrote "it's my opinion," that wouldn't have changed the discussion; I still would have asked, "why do you hold that opinion." I mean, I knew it was your opinion, what I have been asking is: why do you hold the opinion that Europeans were the only way that pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas would advance from "hunter-gatherer" societies? Can/will you answer that?
Because that's the only examples I've had of modern day tribal people and the advancements they have made. If you have other examples please let me know.
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Old 06-02-2008
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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Because that's the only examples I've had of modern day tribal people and the advancements they have made.
You still make no sense.
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Old 06-02-2008
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You still make no sense.
Sorry. It makes sense to me.

Do you know of non European tribal people who have created electricity, combustion engine, or have been making steps toward these things? Until recently did many seem to really care about these things? From the 1600s-1800s while Whites in what is now the US built log cabins and houses, most Natives lived in teepees or huts as they had before Europeans came. They could have "copied" Europeans and built log cabins but most didn't want to live that way. Even Cynthia Ann Parker, mother of Chief Quannah Parker, who was White and kidnapped by Natives as a child, didn't want to live like Europeans when they found her as an adult and brought her back to White relatives. She starved herself to death. I have never heard of/read about non-White tribal people going in the same technological directions as White people- even in the past 100 years unless they assimilated into White society. So I have no point of reference to make me think that tribal people who had their histories disrupted in a violent manner would have been any different if they could have continued on undisturbed. If you know of any tribal people who progressed in a way I'm not aware of let me know.
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Old 06-02-2008
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Default Re: Amazon tribe sighting raises dilemma

I read some scientist actually knew about this (and other tribes) for the last 20 years, so it's hardly a "NEW" discovery. Still, it's fascinating.
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Old 06-02-2008
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Default Re: Amazon tribe sighting raises dilemma

I really hope they leave them and what's left of the rain forests alone.
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Old 06-02-2008
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[quote=pelotero]And you know this how again?
[/QUOTE=lua]
History and manmy different sources and books.
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I have been to Yucatan and Chichen Itza and it was amazing, except that most everything the guide talked about had to do with human sacrifice. It's odd that the people so mysteriously left there and there wasn't anything so advanced at a later time?
Guides, eh? I am sure the guides are told what to say.

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Originally Posted by lua
Sorry. It makes sense to me.

Do you know of non European tribal people who have created electricity, combustion engine, or have been making steps toward these things? Until recently did many seem to really care about these things? From the 1600s-1800s while Whites in what is now the US built log cabins and houses, most Natives lived in teepees or huts as they had before Europeans came. They could have "copied" Europeans and built log cabins but most didn't want to live that way. Even Cynthia Ann Parker, mother of Chief Quannah Parker, who was White and kidnapped by Natives as a child, didn't want to live like Europeans when they found her as an adult and brought her back to White relatives. She starved herself to death. I have never heard of/read about non-White tribal people going in the same technological directions as White people- even in the past 100 years unless they assimilated into White society. So I have no point of reference to make me think that tribal people who had their histories disrupted in a violent manner would have been any different if they could have continued on undisturbed. If you know of any tribal people who progressed in a way I'm not aware of let me know.
Care to think that the people didnt need to change their way if they had been working for them before?

Their ways were tried and proven for the area long before the white man came. They had no need to change their life around the europeans.

ANd you may not have known this or not, but the whites/ europeans have been enslaving the minds and bodys of the natives since their arrival.

I also saw you make a statement about tradind and lack of horses. Didnt matter, did you know that on foot the Apache could travel 45 miles every day. Did you know that in Mexico and i am sure South America people ran our walked. It didnt take them that long.
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Last edited by tecpaocelotl; 06-02-2008 at 10:30 AM.
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Old 06-02-2008
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[quote=Nelio;923100]
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Originally Posted by pelotero
And you know this how again?
[/QUOTE=lua]
History and manmy different sources and books.

Guides, eh? I am sure the guides are told what to say.
Actually this guy was really cool and independent. He was around 60 years old. He was half Mayan and from the area and was very proud of it. He knew about all the symbols and everything. Actually he talked about the symbols a little too much for my tastes but other than that he seemed like a great guide. He really loved that place. If he saw people touching the structures he would ask them not to because it degraded what original color was still left on them. Even at 60 he was learning Japanese because he thought it would help him in his business.

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Originally Posted by Nelio View Post
Care to think that the people didnt need to change their way if they had been working for them before?

Their ways were tried and proven for the area long before the white man came. They had no need to change their life around the europeans.

ANd you may not have known this or not, but the whites/ europeans have been enslaving the minds and bodys of the natives since their arrival.

I also saw you make a statement about tradind and lack of horses. Didnt matter, did you know that on foot the Apache could travel 45 miles every day. Did you know that in Mexico and i am sure South America people ran our walked. It didnt take them that long.

I don't think they should've changed. That's my point. I don't know of any instance where Natives changed much through centuries unless forced to, at least until very recently. Some of my people were on the Trail of Tears.

Last edited by tecpaocelotl; 06-02-2008 at 10:31 AM.
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Old 06-02-2008
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Default Re: Rare uncontacted tribe photographed in Amazon

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History and manmy different sources and books.

Guides, eh? I am sure the guides are told what to say.
And those books are 100% correct right?

how sure would you say you are? Have you been there?

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Originally Posted by Lua View Post

Actually this guy was really cool and independent. He was around 60 years old. He was half Mayan and from the area and was very proud of it. He knew about all the symbols and everything. Actually he talked about the symbols a little too much for my tastes but other than that he seemed like a great guide. He really loved that place. If he saw people touching the structures he would ask them not to because it degraded what original color was still left on them. Even at 60 he was learning Japanese because he thought it would help him in his business.
yeah but he was told what to say by a white person! lol Only these guys on here have pride and integrity in their culture Lua, you should know that by now! *sarcasm*

on a serious note:

It was very nice to visit Chichen-Itza! The trip there was a bit long but also very nice. We made a stop in a small town to eat and it was great also.
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thanks, but i have no car and no money. i think it's just her time. she's already 10 yrs old so, she is an old lady.
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