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  #1  
Old 09-09-2004
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Default Native Mexicans

In the present time, Mexico has about 56 languages indigena languages. Who knows how many languages disapeared. Nahua is the largest group in Mexico. Second is the Maya. Third is Otomi.
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  #2  
Old 09-09-2004
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i thinking about getting a tattoo of the aztec sun and i want to put Abuela above it and Zitli (Grandma in Nahuatl) under it, but i'm still indecisive.

i want to get something in rememberance of my grandmother. i am mexican because of her (and my grandfather) so i figured combine the love and rememberance of my abuela and the love of my self (as a mexican) and combine it......i dunno maybe
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  #3  
Old 09-09-2004
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Default

k...
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  #4  
Old 12-19-2006
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Quote:
Originally Posted by tecpaocelotl
In the present time, Mexico has about 56 languages indigena languages. Who knows how many languages disapeared. Nahua is the largest group in Mexico. Second is the Maya. Third is Otomi.
You learn something new everyday.. Thanks!
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  #5  
Old 12-19-2006
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Welcome.
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  #6  
Old 12-19-2006
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Wow!
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  #7  
Old 12-25-2006
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Quote:
Originally Posted by tecpaocelotl
In the present time, Mexico has about 56 languages indigena languages. Who knows how many languages disapeared. Nahua is the largest group in Mexico. Second is the Maya. Third is Otomi.
Actually... ... ...

As of 2005 here are the most spoken in Mexico.

1.- Nahuatl with 1 376 026 persons
2.- Maya with 759 000
3.- Mixtec languages 423 216
4.- Zapotec languages 410 901
5.- Tzeltzal 371 730
6.- Tzotzil 329 937
7.- Hñahñu (Otomi) 239 850

If you separate all of the Mixtec and Zapotec languages within the family, then... Tzeltzal would go up to number 3 and Tzotzil to number 4.

Yet, as an Otomi I should stress that the Hñahñu nation does not recognize this data from the INEGI, and believe it is the number 1 group in Mexico, even greater than all the variants of Nahuatl altogether.
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  #8  
Old 12-25-2006
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

and tahts just the info picked up from the collected stats, think about how many really do.. even Xikanos.
many, many more..

mexicanz on the rize!
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  #9  
Old 12-25-2006
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

I could believe there's so many that aren't recorded or counted.
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  #10  
Old 12-26-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quimichipilli
and tahts just the info picked up from the collected stats, think about how many really do.. even Xikanos.
many, many more..

mexicanz on the rize!

Quote:
Originally Posted by tecpaocelotl
I could believe there's so many that aren't recorded or counted.
Yup! I agree.

Though this stats are only within Mexico's borders and taken to Mexican nationals. Imagine the differences in Mayan and Nahuatl if Central America is taken into account.

Better yet, imagine the people in the US and Europe that talk indigenous languages. It is famous the Otomi colony recognized by Mexico's gov. in Orlando that work in Disney as blue collar employees. Or the Mixtecs that populate the SouthWest. Also many Salvadoreños that speak Nahuatl and its variants also commute a lot to Spain and Portugal!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ojitos619
Is there a way where someone can arrange the languages by states or areas in Mexico?

Like to see what languages are spoken in what areas.
Hey Ojitos! Here's a link that indicate the percentage of peoples that talk an indigenous language by state. I am still looking for more specific info by languages.

http://www.inegi.gob.mx/est/contenid...=mlen02&c=3327
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Last edited by tecpaocelotl; 12-27-2006 at 08:37 AM.
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  #11  
Old 12-27-2006
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Quote:
Originally Posted by ojitos619
Is there a way where someone can arrange the languages by states or areas in Mexico?

Like to see what languages are spoken in what areas.
If you're interested in what language is spoken, just give me a specific location and I could probably figure out which one is spoken there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TlacuiloPilo
Better yet, imagine the people in the US and Europe that talk indigenous languages. It is famous the Otomi colony recognized by Mexico's gov. in Orlando that work in Disney as blue collar employees. Or the Mixtecs that populate the SouthWest. Also many Salvadoreños that speak Nahuatl and its variants also commute a lot to Spain and Portugal!
You forgot the Zapotecs in Fresno.
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  #12  
Old 12-30-2006
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Quote:
Originally Posted by tecpaocelotl
You forgot the Zapotecs in Fresno.
Yeah, I forgot those and many more. Like the Nahuas from Puebla at NYC, very famous here in Mexico. It would be virtually impossible to name all of our people that are scattered all over the world due to poverty and lack of work here in Mexico.
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  #13  
Old 01-02-2007
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

I've know of a colonia of Mixtecs in Merced, CA here in the Central Valley as well.
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  #14  
Old 01-16-2007
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

My dad speaks a native language called masagua;not sure if thats how you spell it, but when i was younger i started picking it up then forgot it when I moved to the states because my jefa doesnt speak it. Not sure if any of you has heard of it?
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  #15  
Old 01-17-2007
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhiLLyMexican
My dad speaks a native language called masagua;not sure if thats how you spell it, but when i was younger i started picking it up then forgot it when I moved to the states because my jefa doesnt speak it. Not sure if any of you has heard of it?
You mean Mazahua (sounds like Ma-za-wa)? I heard of it. What region is your father from?
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  #16  
Old 01-17-2007
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Yeah, I believe thats what it is. Well my parents are from Ixtlahuaca, Estado De Mexico (little towns near that region). My father is from a town called San Pedro De Los Baños, Estado De Mexico. I was asking him about it when I came across this thread...He can speak it fluently but told me my grandparents never taught him how to write it....But most of my family thats here in the states can speak it...I always catch them speaking it but cant understand a word...I think its important to learn about it to keep the culture alive...If you have any info on it or who speaks it....What regions they speak it...Where it derived from....What the indigenas that spoke it were called...I would appreciate it...Thanks
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  #17  
Old 01-17-2007
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhiLLyMexican
Yeah, I believe thats what it is. Well my parents are from Ixtlahuaca, Estado De Mexico (little towns near that region). My father is from a town called San Pedro De Los Baños, Estado De Mexico. I was asking him about it when I came across this thread...He can speak it fluently but told me my grandparents never taught him how to write it....But most of my family thats here in the states can speak it...I always catch them speaking it but cant understand a word...I think its important to learn about it to keep the culture alive...If you have any info on it or who speaks it....What regions they speak it...Where it derived from....What the indigenas that spoke it were called...I would appreciate it...Thanks
Story clears out from what I know.

I personally don't have any Mazahua language books or know any sites that have any writings.

What I do know is term Mazahua comes from the Nahuatl language which means Deer People. Originally name is Hñatho (no idea how to pronounce it since it's in Mazahua.).

I did post a news article that I found them uprising a month ago:

http://www.soychicano.com/forums/showthread.php?t=25359

Also in this link, it has videos on each different tribe in Mexico:

http://www.soychicano.com/forums/showthread.php?t=21531

Here's the video for the Mazahua:

http://cdi.gob.mx/monografias/pueblo...hua_edomex.ram

My best advice for you from me is ask your family more on it since they know the language.
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Last edited by tecpaocelotl; 01-17-2007 at 03:04 PM.
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  #18  
Old 01-17-2007
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

thanks for the response and article
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  #19  
Old 01-17-2007
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Having flash backs of my life and I do remember when I was 13 my aunt in Guadalajara having Mazahua neighbors. I remember hearing them talk once, and they got quiet when I got near their house.
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  #20  
Old 01-17-2007
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Below is a listing and key code to Mexican languages, followed by the coded MAPS. Nahuatl Languages are coordinate numbers that are colored RED in the list below. Mazahua are colored BLUE. The data do not include migrating populations throughout Mexico and the U.S.

Key to Mexico language maps
Language name Coordinate on map
Afro-Seminole Creole 18
Akateko 142
Amuzgo, Guerrero 90
Amuzgo, Ipalapa 260
Amuzgo, San Pedro Amuzgos 259
Chatino, Eastern Highland 269
Chatino, Nopala 271
Chatino, Tataltepec 265
Chatino, Western Highland 268
Chatino, Zacatepec 267
Chatino, Zenzontepec 256
Chichimeca-Jonaz 2
Chichimeca-Jonaz 29
Chinantec, Chiltepec 170
Chinantec, Comaltepec 175
Chinantec, Lalana 226
Chinantec, Lealao 102
Chinantec, Ojitlan 169
Chinantec, Ozumacin 173
Chinantec, Palantla 171
Chinantec, Quiotepec 176
Chinantec, Sochiapan 179
Chinantec, Tepetotutla 177
Chinantec, Tepinapa 172
Chinantec, Tlacoatzintepec 178
Chinantec, Usila 168
Chinantec, Valle Nacional 174
Chochotec 183
Chol, Tila 130
Chol, Tumbala 133
Chontal, Highland Oaxaca 117
Chontal, Lowland Oaxaca 116
Chontal, Tabasco 132
Chuj, Ixtatan 141
Cora, El Nayar 24
Cora, Santa Teresa 23
Cuicatec, Tepeuxila 180
Cuicatec, Teutila 165
Huarijio 9
Huastec, San Luis Potosi 32
Huastec, Southeastern 36
Huastec, Veracruz 34
Huave, San Dionisio del Mar 121
Huave, San Francisco del Mar 122
Huave, Santa Maria del Mar 119
Huave, Santa Maria del Mar 120
Huichol 25
Ixcatec 184
Jacaltec, Western 140
Jakalteko, Western 140
Kanjobal, Western 142
Kickapoo 19
Kiliwa 4
Kumiai 1
Lacandon 134
Mam, Northern 146
Mam, Todos Santos 147
Mam, Todos Santos Cuchumatan 147
Matlatzinca, Atzingo 47
Matlatzinca, San Francisco 46
Maya, Chan Santa Cruz 39
Maya, Yucatan 38
Mayo 8
Mazahua Central 44
Mazahua, Michoacan 45

Mazatec, Ayautla 166
Mazatec, Chiquihuitlan 164
Mazatec, Huautla 159
Mazatec, Ixcatlan 161
Mazatec, Jalapa de Diaz 167
Mazatec, Mazatlan 157
Mazatec, San Jeronimo Tecoatl 158
Mazatec, Soyaltepec 160
Mixe, Coatlan 105
Mixe, Isthmus 107
Mixe, Juquila 112
Mixe, Mazatlan 106
Mixe, North Central 103
Mixe, Quetzaltepec 104
Mixe, Tlahuitoltepec 232
Mixe, Totontepec 228
Mixtec, Alacatlatzala 85
Mixtec, Alcozauca 86
Mixtec, Amoltepec 253
Mixtec, Apasco-Apoala 181
Mixtec, Atatlahuca 197
Mixtec, Ayutla 82
Mixtec, Cacaloxtepec 185
Mixtec, Chayuco 264
Mixtec, Chazumba 152
Mixtec, Chigmecatitlan 72
Mixtec, Coatzospan 162
Mixtec, Cuyamecalco 163
Mixtec, Diuxi-Tilantongo 201
Mixtec, Huitepec 209
Mixtec, Itundujia 252
Mixtec, Ixtayutla 257
Mixtec, Jamiltepec 263
Mixtec, Juxtlahuaca 190
Mixtec, Magdalena Penasco 200
Mixtec, Metlatonoc 89
Mixtec, Mitlatongo 205
Mixtec, Mixtepec 189
Mixtec, Northern Tlaxiaco 188
Mixtec, Northwest Oaxaca 186
Mixtec, Ocotepec 198
Mixtec, Penoles 211
Mixtec, Pinotepa Nacional 262
Mixtec, San Juan Colorado 261
Mixtec, San Juan Teita 204
Mixtec, San Miguel el Grande 196
Mixtec, San Miguel Piedras 247
Mixtec, Santa Lucia Monteverde 195
Mixtec, Santa Maria Zacatepec 258
Mixtec, Silacayoapan 87
Mixtec, Sindihui 248
Mixtec, Sinicahua 199
Mixtec, Southeastern Nochixtlan 207
Mixtec, Southern Puebla 151
Mixtec, Southwestern Tlaxiaco 194
Mixtec, Soyaltepec 182
Mixtec, Tacahua 250
Mixtec, Tamazola 206
Mixtec, Tezoatlan 187
Mixtec, Tidaa 202
Mixtec, Tijaltepec 249
Mixtec, Tlazoyaltepec 210
Mixtec, Tututepec 266
Mixtec, Western Juxtlahuaca 88
Mixtec, Yoloxochitl 93
Mixtec, Yosondua 251
Mixtec, Yucuane 203
Mixtec, Yutanduchi 208
Mocho 145
Nahuatl, Central 75
Nahuatl, Central Huasteca 35
Nahuatl, Central Puebla 73
Nahuatl, Coatepec 79
Nahuatl, Durango 20
Nahuatl, Eastern Huasteca 37
Nahuatl, Guerrero 80
Nahuatl, Highland Puebla 61
Nahuatl, Huaxcaleca 67
Nahuatl, Isthmus-Cosoleacaque 97
Nahuatl, Isthmus-Mecayapan 95
Nahuatl, Isthmus-Pajapan 94
Nahuatl, Michoacan 26
Nahuatl, Morelos 77
Nahuatl, Northern Oaxaca 156
Nahuatl, Northern Puebla 64
Nahuatl, Ometepec 91
Nahuatl, Orizaba 68
Nahuatl, Santa Maria la Alta 71
Nahuatl, Southeastern Puebla 155
Nahuatl, Temascaltepec 48
Nahuatl, Tenango 62
Nahuatl, Tetelcingo 76
Nahuatl, Tlalitzlipa 63
Nahuatl, Tlamacazapa 78
Nahuatl, Western Huasteca 33

Otomi, Eastern Highland 53
Otomi, Estado de Mexico 42
Otomi, Ixtenco 74
Otomi, Mezquital 41
Otomi, Queretaro 40
Otomi, Temoaya 43
Otomi, Tenango 54
Otomi, Texcatepec 50
Otomi, Tilapa 49
Paipai 10
Paipai 3
Pame, Central 30
Pame, Northern 31
Papiamentu 5
Plautdietsch 12
Popoloca, Coyotepec 148
Popoloca, Mezontla 153
Popoloca, San Felipe Otlaltepec 149
Popoloca, San Juan Atzingo 154
Popoloca, San Luis Temalacayuca 69
Popoloca, San Marcos Tlalcoyalco 70
Popoloca, Santa Ines Ahuatempan 150
Popoluca, Highland 96
Popoluca, Oluta 99
Popoluca, Sayula 100
Popoluca, Texistepec 98
Purepecha 28
Purepecha, Western Highland 27
Seri 6
Tacanec 143
Tarahumara, Central 13
Tarahumara, Lowland 14
Tarahumara, Northern 11
Tarahumara, Southeastern 17
Tarahumara, Southwestern 15
Tectitec 144
Tektiteko 144
Tepehua, Huehuetla 55
Tepehua, Pisaflores 52
Tepehua, Tlachichilco 51
Tepehuan, Northern 16
Tepehuan, Southeastern 21
Tepehuan, Southwestern 22
Tlapanec, Acatepec 81
Tlapanec, Azoyu 92
Tlapanec, Malinaltepec 84
Tlapanec, Tlacoapa 83
Tojolabal 139
Totonac, Coyutla 57
Totonac, Highland 60
Totonac, Ozumatlan 66
Totonac, Papantla 58
Totonac, Patla-Chicontla 65
Totonac, Xicotepec de Juarez 56
Totonac, Yecuatla 59
Triqui, Chicahuaxtla 193
Triqui, Copala 192
Triqui, San Martin Itunyoso 191
Tzeltal, Bachajon 135
Tzeltal, Oxchuc 136
Tzotzil, Chamula 125
Tzotzil, Chenalho 129
Tzotzil, Huixtan 137
Tzotzil, San Andres Larrainzar 126
Tzotzil, Venustiano Carranza 138
Tzotzil, Zinacantan 124
Yaqui 7
Zapotec, Aloapam 216
Zapotec, Amatlan 276
Zapotec, Asuncion Mixtepec 243
Zapotec, Ayoquesco 240
Zapotec, Cajonos 221
Zapotec, Chichicapan 236
Zapotec, Choapan 101
Zapotec, Coatecas Altas 241
Zapotec, Coatlan 274
Zapotec, El Alto 244
Zapotec, Elotepec 246
Zapotec, Guevea de Humboldt 111
Zapotec, Guila 235
Zapotec, Isthmus 110
Zapotec, Lachixio 118
Zapotec, Lachixio 242
Zapotec, Loxicha 272
Zapotec, Mazaltepec 214
Zapotec, Miahuatlan 275
Zapotec, Mitla 234
Zapotec, Mixtepec 278
Zapotec, Ocotlan 238
Zapotec, Ozolotepec 280
Zapotec, Petapa 108
Zapotec, Quiavicuzas 113
Zapotec, Quioquitani-Quieri 277
Zapotec, Rincon 225
Zapotec, San Agustin Mixtepec 279
Zapotec, San Baltazar Loxicha 273
Zapotec, San Juan Guelavia 219
Zapotec, San Pedro Quiatoni 233
Zapotec, San Vicente Coatlan 270
Zapotec, Santa Catarina Albarradas 220
Zapotec, Santa Ines Yatzechi 239
Zapotec, Santa Maria Quiegolani 283
Zapotec, Santiago Xanica 281
Zapotec, Santo Domingo Albarradas 231
Zapotec, Sierra de Juarez 217
Zapotec, Southeastern Ixtlan 218
Zapotec, Southern Rincon 224
Zapotec, Tabaa 223
Zapotec, Tejalapan 213
Zapotec, Texmelucan 255
Zapotec, Tilquiapan 237
Zapotec, Tlacolulita 115
Zapotec, Totomachapan 245
Zapotec, Xadani 284
Zapotec, Xanaguia 282
Zapotec, Yalalag 229
Zapotec, Yareni 215
Zapotec, Yatee 227
Zapotec, Yatzachi 230
Zapotec, Yautepec 114
Zapotec, Zaachila 212
Zapotec, Zaniza 254
Zapotec, Zoogocho 222
Zoque, Chimalapa 109
Zoque, Copainala 127
Zoque, Francisco Leon 123
Zoque, Rayon 128
Zoque, Tabasco 131

Source: Ethnologue
http://www.ethnologue.com/show_map.asp?name=MX

NOTES
Central (#30) and Northern Pame (#31) have Nahuatl-speaking populations as well. The Maya are generally located much further south and east in the Yucatan peninsula, including in Belize. Guerrero has numerous indigenous languages, including Nahuatl, Mixtec, Amuzgo, and Tlapanec.

See these maps for starters:

MEXICO (#31-#39, including UTO-AZTECAN Nahuatl)





WEST CENTRAL MEXICO (#40-#93, including UTO-AZTECAN Nahuatl)





EASTERN CENTRAL MEXICO (#94-#147, including UTO-AZTECAN Nahuatl)





SOUTHERN CENTRAL MEXICO (#148-#284, including UTO-AZTECAN Nahuatl)





FIGURE 1. MEXICAN POPULATIONS WITH GREATER THAN 9,000 NAHUATL-SPEAKING PEOPLES IN VARIOUS FEDERAL ENTITIES.



Nahuatl-speaking peoples belong to one of the largest living native-language groups in North America. More than one million fluent speakers of various Nahuatl dialects live primarily in central and southern regions of Mexico and parts of Cuzcatlan (El Salvador). The Mexican regions with the highest numbers of Nahuatl speakers include the federal entities of Puebla, Veracruz, Hildago, San Luis Potosí, Guerrero, México (state), El Distrito Federal (D.F.), as shown in Figure 1. Smaller groups of Nahuatl speakers can be found in all 31 states of Mexico (qtd. in Rolstad 7) and in migrating populations across several states of the United States (U.S.).

Last edited by citlalin; 01-17-2007 at 04:01 PM.
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Old 01-17-2007
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Yeah heres an article on them that i found....


http://www.houstonculture.org/mexico/mexico3.html


According to the 2000 census, the population of persons five years and more who spoke indigenous languages in the state of México totaled 361,972 individuals. A large range of languages is spoken in the state of México, many of them imported from southern or eastern Mexican states. The most common indigenous languages spoken is the Mazahua tongue, with a total of 113,424 indigenous speakers, representing 31.3% of all the indigenous speakers five years of age and over in the state.


The second most common language is the Otomí, spoken by 104,357 indigenous speakers, and representing 28.8% of the total indigenous speaking population. The most common languages spoken are:

1. Mazahua 113,424 31.3%
2. Otomí 104,357 28.8%
3. Náhuatl 55,802 15.4%
4. Mixteco 26,615 7.4%
5. Zapoteco 16,704 4.6%
6. Mazateco 8,796 2.4%
7. Totonaca 8,479 2.3%
8. Mixe 4,584 1.3%
9. Chinanteco 1,861 0.5%
10. Tlapaneco 1,761 0.5%
11. Purépecha 1,754 0.5%
12. Maya 1,372 0.4%
13. Triqui 1,304 0.4%
INEGI, Población de 5 Años y Más Que Habla Alguna Lengua Indígena por Entidad Federativa y Tipo de Lengua, y Su Distribución Según Condición de Habla Española y Sexo"


The Mazahua Indians - representing the most populous indigenous-speaking group in México - primarily occupy thirteen municipios in the northwestern portion of the state of México. Mazahuas also inhabit some municipios in the center of the state, as well as parts of eastern Michoacán. They are a division of the Oto-Manguean linguistic group and are related by both culture and language to the Otomí, from whom they are descended.

The Mazahua are believed to have been among the original tribes who migrated to central México during the Thirteenth Century. In 1521, Hernán Cortés - after subduing the Mexica - consolidated his power by sending Gonzalo de Sandoval to subdue all resistance among the Aztec neighbors: the Mazahuas, Matlazincas and Otomies. Very quickly, Gonzalo de Sandoval brought the Mazahua Indians under Spanish control, and the Franciscan missionaries played a prominent role in bringing Christianity to their people.

Today, most of the Mazahua are engaged in agricultural pursuits, specifically the growing of maize, pumpkin, maguey and frijol. In the years since the Conquest, the Mazahua population has evolved and its cultural elements, social organization, and religion have developed into a hybrid culture drawing from several cultural elements. No one is certain about the origin of the word Mazahua, but some have suggested that it is derived from the Náhuatl term, mázatl, meaning "deer."

The Mazahua make up a significant portion of the population of several municipios in the state. In the municipio of Atlacomulco, the population of Mazahua speakers five years of age and over in 2000 consisted of 10,709 individuals, making up 17.1% of the population of the municipio. In the municipio of Donato Guerra, 5,419 Mazahuas represented 24% of the population of the municipio. In Ixtlahuaca, 19,203 Mazahuas represented 19.8% of the total population.

The Otomí are the second largest linguistic group in México state. They call themselves "Hñahñu," the word Otomí having been given to them by the Spanish. Otomí are a very diverse indigenous group, living in many communities throughout Central México and speaking a great variety of dialects, some of which are not mutually intelligible. Like the Mazahuas, they belong to the Oto-Manguean linguistic group. Significant numbers of Otomies occupy 14 of the 121 municipios in the state of México, most of these municipios being located in the northwest (Atlacomulco-Timilpan) and in the center (Toluca-Lerma).

Although the Náhuatl-speaking population is the most populous group in the entire Mexican Republic, they are ranked third place in the state of México, with more than 15% of the total indigenous-speaking population.

The influence of migrant labor is particularly significant to the state of Mexico. Out a total population of 13,096,686 in the 2000 census, 5,059,089 individuals - or 38.6% - were born in another political entity than the state of México. The primary states contributing to México's migrant population were - in numerical order - the Federal District (more than 3 million people), Puebla (295,889 migrants), Oaxaca (256,786), Hidalgo (256,71, and Michoacán (231,811). Oaxaca's significant contribution amounted to 5.1% of the migrant pool, which explains why the Mixteco and Zapoteco languages from Oaxaca are the fourth and fifth most common indigenous groups in the state.

The Mazateco speakers represented the sixth largest group in 2000. Speakers of this language are mainly migrants from the states of Oaxaca and Guerrero. They are also classified as a division of the Oto-Manguean linguistic group. The Totonaca speakers - numbering more than 8,000 individuals in 2000 - are descendants of Cortés' coastal allies in Veracruz and it is likely that many of these people are from the eastern seaboard area. The Mixe, Chinanteco, and Tlapaneco peoples are primarily found in Guerrero and Oaxaca.

Nearly five hundred years after the conquest and destruction of the Aztec Empire, the culture, language and spirit of the Náhuatl, Otomí, Mazahua and other indigenous peoples remains intact within the central Hispanic culture to which most of them also belong. It is worth noting that, although the Mexica capital Tenochtitlán was occupied after an eighty-day siege, many of the indigenous peoples of Central México quietly submitted to Spanish tutelage. In this way, they were given an opportunity to retain some elements of their original culture, while becoming an integral and important part of a new society.
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Old 01-17-2007
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhiLLyMexican
Yeah heres an article on them that i found....

http://www.houstonculture.org/mexico/mexico3.html
That website, www.houstonculture.org, is a great source of information on Mexico. I never knew that Mazahuas represent the largest group of native speakers in Mexico State. That's impressive!

Unfortunately, I don't know of any university that offers language study in Mazahua. Only a handful of academic instituions teach Nahuatl. So, maybe you or someone out there can learn Mazahua and then teach us!
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Old 01-17-2007
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

yeah, i just found another article....its very interesting


http://www.wes.org/ewenr/04Nov/Americas.htm


Mexico

First University for Native Population Opens
The Mexican government has opened the first in a promised network of “intercultural universities.” These institutions will give priority to indigenous students, a tiny minority of whom goes on to tertiary education, while working to preserve their languages and cultures. The move is part of President Vicente Fox’s promise to redress historical inequities by creating universities that cater to the specific needs of indigenous communities.

The first institution is the Intercultural University of Mexico State, which began classes in September in the farming town of San Felipe del Progreso, 60 miles northwest of Mexico City. The 270 freshmen, two-thirds of whom are Mazahua Indians, are enrolled in sustainable development, intercultural communication or language and culture. The other students are of mixed Indian and Spanish blood, in keeping with the government policy that 20 percent of students at the new universities should be non-Indians.

The university expects to enroll as many as 2,700 students, who will earn five-year bachelor’s degrees or three-year teaching degrees. Seven more intercultural universities are slated to open in areas with large indigenous populations before Fox’s term ends in December 2006, according to the Education Ministry.

— The Chronicle of Higher Education
Oct. 22, 2004
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"Primero tienes que saber lo que quieres para poder obtenerlo."
"Unos hacen preguntas para entender y otros solo se hacen pendeos."
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"No soy cholo pero fui criado en el barrio."
"Sabes que es mas chistoso que un chiste. Una mujer que siempre se queja.
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Old 01-17-2007
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Yeah i should learn it...from when i hear my dad speak it...its not too difficult to learn it...I know how to say tortillas and girls in mazahua...Its kind of like spanish where they have words for...He, she, they...so it shouldn't be too hard to learn...Most of my family on my dads side speaks it...I will learn it and get back to you on that..
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"Primero tienes que saber lo que quieres para poder obtenerlo."
"Unos hacen preguntas para entender y otros solo se hacen pendeos."
"Sabes porque la gente tiene celos. Porque tienen envidia de lo que tienes."
"No soy cholo pero fui criado en el barrio."
"Sabes que es mas chistoso que un chiste. Una mujer que siempre se queja.
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Old 01-17-2007
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Default Re: Native Mexicans

Does anyone know what Native groups are originally from Jalisco? I know that western Jalisco is home to the Cora(mainly from Nayarit) and I'm guessing that there are Purepecha near the Michoacan border, but what about the rest? I've asked down there, but I've NEVER gotten any answers.
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