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  #1  
Old 06-12-2007
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Default Holy Wednesday

I was wondering if anybody read the old Nahuatl play, Holy Wednesday, and ever tripped out on the book especially since Jesus in the play talks about Nahua beliefs. I have read some and couldn't finish it bc I was so tripping out.
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Old 06-12-2007
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Default Re: Holy Wednesday

no... but sounds interesting.... who's the author?
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Old 06-14-2007
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Originally Posted by INDEPENDENT CHICANA View Post
no... but sounds interesting.... who's the author?
Weird thing about author. It was suppose to be a "straight" Nahuatl translation of the original play called Lucero de Nuestra Salvacion in the 16th century, but in recent times, a guy translated the Nahuatl version to English to see how exact was the copy and noticed a lot of things different.

I saw the book for sale 2 weekends ago, but didn't get it.

So your question on author would depend on what you're asking.

Here's a link on the summary of the play:

http://hemi.nyu.edu/archive/studentw...alec/holy.html

In this publication, Louise M. Burkhart analyzes a Nahuatl drama titled miercoles santos, or "Holy Wednesday." Significantly, this manuscript is the earliest known extant script of a play in the Nahuatl language--or any other Native American language.

Early on, Burkhart points out the groundbreaking importance of "Holy Wednesday." After centuries of sitting on the private library shelves ofEuropean auctioneers, this play text was finally recovered for scholars andthe general public in 1986, by an American dealer with expertise in Nahuatl documents. David Szewczyk, of the Philadelphia Rare Books and Manuscripts Society, recognized the drama for what it was, and realized its significance as the only known sixteenth-century manuscript of a Nahuatl play.

As Burkhart explains, "Holy Wednesday belongs to a genre of theatrical performances born of the encounter between the Nahuas of central Mexico and their Franciscan evangelizers" (3). More specifically, "the relevant encounter was between the friars and the young boys of the native nobility whom they took as students" (3). As many scholars of the Spanish conquest are well aware, the first three Franciscanfriars to reach Mexico arrived in 1523; a party of twelve friars came in1524 to set up the first official mission. By the early 1530s, Nahua students of these friars were translating and performing public dramas based on Christian themes. Select, indigenous students first translated the friars' dramas from Spanish into Nahuatl, then staged the dramas for members of the native community in a language that they understood. This process of translation-- Christian writings into the Nahuatl language-- was, at least initially, a keystone of the evangelizing agenda of the Spanish friars. Since they had little comprehension of the indigenous languages, they needed their students to convey their Christian teachings.

One way to understand "Holy Wednesday," then, is simply as an indigenous translation of a Spanish religious drama entitled Lucero de Nuestra Salvación , or "Beacon of Our Salvation." Yet the whole point of Burkhart's analysis is that the surviving Nahuatl manuscript is far more than merely a straightforward 'translation' of Spanish religious traditions and thought. Rather, she posits that the Nahuatl theatre in which this playtext emerged was not just a theatre based on translation, but also a "theatreof transformation" (4. In this indigenous theatre of transformation, Christian narrative "were accomodated to the Nahuatl language and given local nuancesvia word, costume, and gesture. The sacred beings of Christianity appeared in Nahua guise and spoke to their fellow Nahuas" (4.

Starkly to contrast Richard Trexler's view that Spanish friars had total control over the performances they scripted for the indigenous peoples ofMexico,Burkhart puts forth a unique thesis about the political potentialof early Nahuatl theatre. She posits that, in the first few decades after the conquest,"the local church patio, sacred heart of the community, became Bethlehem,Jerusalem, Assisi, and Eden" (4 for the indigenous peoples.In short, "Christianity slipped from the friars' controlling grasp; Nahuas negotiated directly with sacred forces that governed their conflicted, colonized reality" (4.

Burkhart also contends that the Nahuas' theatre of transformation was at once "a theatre of self-legitimation, in which Nahuas represented themselves as pious Christians who understood Christian narrarives, followed Christian teachings, and knew how to handle crosses, gifts of the Magi, and other props and costumes" (4. In describing how the distinctly European tradition oftheatre became a political forum for the defeated peoples of "New Spain,"Burkhart draws attention to the local vested interests at stake. She explains that"since members of the native nobility were more likely thanthe commoners to plan, finance, and perform in these plays, theatre was one means for nobles to establish and assert their claims to leadership" (4.For this reason,the Nahua noblility "determined what discourses and practices would be authoritative within Nahua Christianity, thus mediating between Spanish overlords and Nahua commoners, as well as controlling the form and extent of resistance" (4.Burkhart posits that the representations of native Christianity staged by the Nahuas (after being translated by those young members of the nobility who were also students of the friars) were"directed not only at other Nahuas,but also at Spaniards" (4.

Burkhart's comparison of the Spanish manuscript, "Beacon of Our Salvation," with the Nahuatl version, "Holy Wednesday," is fascinating for several reasons. First, she actually performs a word-for-word translation of the two texts into English. In doing so, Burkhart elucidates some of the intricate complexities of the Nahua value system and world view. She also draws attention to the relative simplicity of the Spanish world view. Secondly, Burkhart pointsout specific instances where the Nahuatl translation of the 'original' Spanish manuscript, "Beacon of Our Salvation," takes on a very different sense and stylistic quality than its source. In fact, the Nahua 'translation' of the Spanish original can barely be viewed as the same play during certain moments of the actions.

Burkhart observes that "if this Nahua playwright's approach to translation was at all representative of the interpreter's art, one must wonder how many other Spanish discourses were similarily transformed as they passed, orally or in writing, into Nahuatl" (100). The obvious implication of this observation is that Spanish texts which purport to translate utterances originally rendered in Nahuatl must also be questioned. "Can these actually represent what native people really said?" (100), Burkhart asks.

The scholar concludes her Introduction to this brilliant book with the following, insightful remark: "No translation is ever a completely faithful versionand transparent reproduction of its source, but if the interpreter does noteven attempt accurately to convey the content and meaning of the originalmessage, the result is something other than what is conventionally termeda translation" (101). She points out that, in Nahuatl, the art of translationwas designated as the "turning of words," or tlahtolcuepaliztlu. Theverb cuepa refers to acts of turning around or inside out, of returning,of responding, and of changing. This complex act, "the turning of words,"is in fact what was performed by the unknown Nahua playwright who translated"The Beacon of Our Salvation" into Nahuatl--into "Holy Wednesday."
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Last edited by tecpaocelotl; 07-24-2007 at 11:38 PM.
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  #4  
Old 07-24-2007
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Default Re: Holy Wednesday

Here is some stuff I could get online which I could read without paying the membership fee. LOL.

Mother and Child
For Izquierdo, as for other authors of contemplative Passion literature, the
relationship between Mary and Christ is the nexus through which the de*
vout person achieves an empathetic understanding of Christianity's prin*
cipal sacred narrative. The portrayal of that relationship acts as a potent
model both of and for inter-gender and inter-generational communication
and conflict. Mary is the ultimate mother, Christ the supreme son; their
interaction elevates human family ties to a cosmic level. The nature of those
ties impinges, thus, not only upon religious practice but also upon broader
constructions of kin relations, authority patterns, and personhood.
The Nahua playwright's treatment of Mary and Christ differs signifi*
cantly from Izquierdo's. The Nahuatl Mary is invested with more authority
and more knowledge than her Spanish counterpart. Her son is less inclined
to contradict her and treats her with more deference. Mother and son en*
gage in displays of agreement and solidarity that are lacking in the Spanish
source. Given the Nahua elite's sophisticated codes of polite conversation,
plus the fact that sixteenth-century Nahua women had more authority
within the family than their Spanish contemporaries, these alterations are
not surprising. Nor do they overtly contradict the friars' Christian doc*
trines; the Franciscans were great devotees of Mary and would not have
taken offense at this depiction of her character. However, the changes do,
in two subtle ways, affect the play's overall message.



Commentary on the Plays
THROUGHOUT THE FOLLOWING ANNOTATIONS I make frequent refer*
ence to other Nahuatl texts, including those that are excerpted in the Ap*
pendix. I will briefly describe these materials before proceeding with the
stanza-by-stanza commentary.
The Nahua playwright was surely familiar with some of the Nahuatl
literature circulating at the time; even texts not directly known to the play*
wright may serve as comparative material, since they provide information
on how certain subjects were discussed and ideas expressed in Nahuatl.
Published Franciscan works such as fray Pedro de Gante 1553 Doctrina,
fray Juan de Gaona Coloquios de la pa y tranquilidad christiana of 1582,
and the 1583 Psalmodia christiana would have been readily available. The
playwright could consult fray Alonso de Molina's 1571 dictionary regard*
ing the meanings of Spanish words.
Published works from other religious orders may have been available
as well. These include Dominican texts, such as the anonymous Doctrina
of 1548 and fray Domingo de la Anunciación 1565 catechism. The Au*
gustinian Juan de la Anunciación had published a catechism in 1575 and a
lengthy volume of sermons in 1577.
The playwright may also have had access to unpublished Nahuatl ma*
terials at Tlatelolco, such as the Colloquios, the Exercicio, and the sermons of
the Franciscan preachers Alonso de Escalona and Bernardino de Sahagún.
Excerpts from Escalona's sermons are included in the Appendix. The Ex*
ercicio
is a collection of meditations and prayers for each day of the week.
Sahagún claimed to have discovered this text among the Indians and re*
written it (or, more likely, had his Nahua students rewrite it) in order to
correct its many errors ( Sahagún 1574). Such works as the Exercico and the
Psalmodia christiana are particularly valuable because they were intended...




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Old 03-13-2008
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Default Re: Holy Wednesday

You can read the Nahuatl text of this here:

http://www.albany.edu/anthro/nah_the...yWednesday.pdf
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Old 04-06-2009
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Default Re: Holy Wednesday

bump
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Old 04-06-2009
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Default Re: Holy Wednesday

That is trippy but lay off the peyote man
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Old 04-06-2009
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Default Re: Holy Wednesday

Jesus knew Nahuatl?

Damn, maybe the Mormons were right and he did come to America...
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Old 04-06-2009
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Default Re: Holy Wednesday

man i know plenty of niggaz named jesus that speak nahuatl
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Old 04-16-2014
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Default Re: Holy Wednesday

Since it's Holy Wednesday, I'll be bumping this thread. Good read for those who want a different aspect.
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Old 03-23-2016
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Default Re: Holy Wednesday

bump
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